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  • Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ​ NINA A. ISABELLE Kingston, NY nina@ninaisabelle.com ​ Nina Isabelle is a process based artist working with perception, action, language, and phenomena. Her practice is a method to sort and solve the inconsistencies of language, memory, and form. She makes paintings, drawings, photographs, video, sculpture, sound, performance and writing as inquiry into how sensory perception functions as the impetus for action, reaction, response, and choice making in art and life. Her work often merges disciplines as she explores how sense data compels actions, informs concepts, and the unconscious and conscious impact these variables have on decision making processes used to construct meaning and worlds. Motivated by the failure of dialogue, the dissonance between form and content, the imposition of objects in space, as well as the deficiencies of literal language, her projects highlight how modes of psychic imprinting and cerebral interpretations come together to organize perception in ways that can inform and solidify new possibilities and transformations. She often arranges structures for action, gesture, and performance as a way to reveal surprises or new information. She might act out directives such as repetitive gestures and/or categorical movements inspired by mathematical number sequences, geometric or asymmetrical patterns, GPS location, or directions within open time segments to find ways that improvised movements, reactions, and responses can be examined, quantified, relearned, or transformed. Her projects often compel her to construct life size human forms, sew garments or other wearable objects, wrap and/or suspend arrangements, weld steel structures that might become a wearable, percussion instrument, a kinetic sculpture, or all three. The sculptural objects that result from her process are project-specific and function as concept-artifacts, or evidence of a process of engaging with physical material. Along the way and afterward, she scrutinizes everything including conception, design, creation, physical actions & interactions, and destructive elements as a way to notice inconsistencies or transformations that demonstrate how manipulating physical material might reveal information about ways of manipulating non physical dimensions including concepts. ​ Isabelle use photography and video documentation as instruments to highlight and inspect sensory inconsistencies and memory schisms that occur throughout expanded timelines. By simultaneously displacing perception into three different vantages (the observer, the observed, and the observer of the observed,) she is able to engage with documentation as a tool to untangle problems related to sequence and simultaneity, physical location and material, the affability of memory, the complexities of self and other, and the inconsistencies experienced by the observer and experiencer over time. Her projects often include soundscapes made using her personal collection of audio samples including inaudible language or partially told stories, text-to-speech robots, discordant and degraded audio bombardments, multilayered barrages of noises sampled from her life such as gun shots, clicking bicycle sprockets, wind hitting a microphone, my kids, and my own improvised interactions with musical instruments. As part of her process, Isabelle will stretch, layer, reverse, overlap, or modify her soundscapes creating a cacophonic experience that might engage and scramble or distract and divert a portion of perception with the goal of freeing up other awareness functions. Isabelle's work has been presented at The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York City, The Queens Museum as part of Emergency Index Documentation Discussion, Judson Memorial Church, Grace Exhibition Space, and ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space in NYC with Feminist Art Group, as well as at Para//el Performance Space and The Ear in Brooklyn, NY. Internationally her projects have been presented at Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Gimpo, South Korea, The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain, Bangkok Underground Film Festival in Thailand, and NA Gallery in South Korea. Nationally her work has been shown at The San Diego Art Institute, The New School's exhibition at The Bushwick Collective, Roman Susan in Chicago, IL, and CX Silver Gallery in Brattleboro VT, among others. In 2018 Isabelle founded Three Phase Center for Collaborative Art Research & Building in Stone Ridge, NY where she facilitates, collaborate with, and document the work of process based conceptual and performance artists. Three Phase Center also produces a video documentary series titled Documenting Process that aims to substantiate the utility of art processes that challenge the measures of value established by institutions and markets by highlighting the lateral values of the processes and practices artists engage with that benefit their social spheres, themselves, or larger communities in less quantifiable ways. The series features artists talking about their practices, process, influences, motivations, and future plans in relatable and accessible terms. Isabelle is continually motivated to work, present projects, facilitate, and collaborate with artists and idea people of any sort. Please feel free to contact her to schedule a studio visit. She also have many pieces of artwork for sale and is happy to discuss commissioned works including painting, drawing, photography, video, and sculpture. ​ Educational Statement I first studied art at Pennsylvania School of Art and Design, and then at The University of Utah. I received my Bachelor's in Art from Westminster College and graduated with honors in 1999. While I cared about art as a tool for finding and making meaning, I disagreed with the notions of art as a craft to replicate reality and that significance could be determined by external sources of authority. In place of my formal schooling, I credit the development of my art approach to the lives and work of artists, colleagues, friends, writers, and thinkers including Susan Langer, Linda Montano, Sasha Morgenthaler, Ray Eames, Hilma af Klint, Käthe Kollwitz, Louise Bourgeois, Hans Haacke, Henry Moore, Jim Dine, The Starn Brothers, Nelson Goodman, Noam Chomsky, Paavo Pylkkänen, and Willard Van Orman Quine. ​ ​ Exhibitions, Collaborations, Participations & Projects 2022 Livestream - Nina Isabelle & Adriana Magaña at Jennifer Zackin's Upstate Art Open Studio, July 2022 2021 Building as Being / Construction as Performance - IV Castellanos & Nina Isabelle at Rosekill Performance Art Farm, June 2021 2021 Nina Isabelle - Artist, Thinker, Observer , Theresa Widman's Podcast #183 2021 The Black Meta Interviews Nina Isabelle for Radio Kingston, by Beetle & Freedom Walker, May 2021 2021 Psychic Self Defense, Artlife Institute, Kingston, NY 2021 Imagined Performance written by Nina Isabelle presented by IV Castellanos, Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY 2020 Meet The Makers, Children's Museum of Art in NYC interviews Nina Isabelle, October 21, 2020 2020 Spheres of Performance, Perception, and Value, virtual presentation for The Hynes Institute of Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Iona College, September 2020 2020 Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation, Grace Exhibition Space, NYC , May 1, 2020 2020 Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, Grace Exhibition Space, NYC . May 15, 2020 2020 EQUINOX, An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 2019 The Shape of a Feeling & the Languages of Organizational Structures, The Esthetic Apostle, October 2019. Web. 2019 Choices & Voices, The Ear, Brooklyn, NY 2019 Remarkable New Locations, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2019 April 5th Video for Daily Trumpet by Jonathan Horowitz. Web. 2019 Illuminating Intangibles with Amelia Iaia at Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY 2019 Documentation Discussion with LiVEART.US & Emergency INDEX at Queens Museum 2018 Empathy Blinders by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 2018 LaTable Ronde / Critical Practices Round Table #7.1 on Careerism, NYC 2018 In Honor Of, The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, NYC 2018 actLife , Linda Montano, Nye Ffarrabas (Bici Forbes,) Cai Xi, Lee Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Sharon Myers, C.X. Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2018 Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity , Movement Metaphors Time Travel Workshop, Kingston, NY 2018 No Nudes / No Sunsets , Greene County Council on the Arts, Catskill, NY 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY 2018 Animalia , 2018 Anarchist Art Fair at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2018 Performancy Forum, ForceYourself to be Good , Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives , Feminist Art Group, ABC No Rio in Exile at Bullet Space, NYC 2018 The Hymn Warp Transducer, Paul McMahon's Bedstock, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Muscular Bonding, New Genres Arts Festival, Living Arts, with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, Tulsa, OK 2018 M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus,) with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, in St. Louis, MO 2018 Video Manifestation System by Nina A. Isabelle, Human Trash Dump, www.archive.org , 2018 Piano Portraits with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo in Catskill, NY 2018 Beast Conjuring , The Mothership, Woodstock, NY 2017 MKUVM , Human Trash Dump, Nov. 27, 2017, www.archive.org 2017 Vidiot , The Unstitute, Catalonia, Spain & Virtual 2017 4th Iteration of The Bedroom by T.W.A.T. (The Women Art Team), Holland Tunnel Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2017 CENTENNIAL:SHE , Greene County Council on the Arts, Catskill, NY 2017 Patricia Field's Art/Fashion Show, Joe's Garage, Catskill, NY 2017 Feminist Art Group Performance, Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY 2017 Midtown Arts District Art Walk, Kingston, NY 2017 The Shirt Factory Centennial, Kingston, NY 2017 The Unstitute's Projection Room, Integrative Ontological Practices by Selden Paterson & The Eucharist Machine by Nina Isabelle, Catalonia, Spain & Virtual 2017 We Are The Secret Garden , The Stable Yard at Ernest, Anna, & Ming's in Kingston, NY 2017 The Bedroom , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea 2017 Just Situations with FAG, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2017 Ungovernable Zone by Anarko Art Lab at Secret Garden Art Festival at Ft. Tilden, NYC 2017 Beautiful Symphony: Women Creating Chaos with F.A.G at Rosekill, Rosendale, NY 2017 Experimental Archery & Mark Making, Rosekill, Rosendale, NY 2017 MOTHERING , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY 2017 If You Don't Go Out In The Woods , Legacy Fatale, Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY 2017 oUT iN tHE zONE, Anarchist Art Festival #11, Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 UNITY, The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 Wish You Were Here II, The Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY 2017 Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.) Knights of The Round Table , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2017 Stages, Green Kill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 Property, Roman Susan & Rogers Park / West Ridge Historical, Chicago, IL 2017 Bangkok Underground Film Festival, Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand 2017 Embarrassed of the Whole, Time Travel Research, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY 2017 SHORTCUT TO HELL, Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY 2016 Laundry Loops with JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. (Feminist Art Group, ) Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY 2016 The Dead Are Not Quiet, San Diego Art Institute, San Diego, CA 2016 Artist and Location , Czong Institute For Contemporary Art (CICA) Museum, Gimpo, Korea 2016 The Jernquist Coloring Book Show, Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin 2016 PoliTRICKS , Art Ellipsis, Philladephia, PA 2016 Feminist Art Group in IV Soldiers Gallery at Rosekill Performance Farm, Rosendale, NY 2016 85th Annual Woodstock Library Fair, Woodstock, NY 2016 The Shirt Factory Open Studios, Kingston, NY 2016 The New School / Bushwick Collective, Brooklyn, NY 2016 The Shirt Factory Artists , Wired Gallery, High Falls, NY 2016 Wish You Were Here , The Old Glenford Church Studio, Glenford, NY 2016 Installation and Performance at The Art Life Institute with Clara Diamond, Kingston, NY 2016 The Pain Project / Alice Teeple-Now Is Real , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2015 Silent Mass Generator Workshop , Grace Exhibition Space Archive, Kingston, NY 2015 Instinct , The Parliament, York, PA 2015 Posthumous Collaborations , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2015 Abstract Mediums , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2014 Witness: The Cedar Tavern Phone Booth Show , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2014 Old Pro , Punk Rock Fish Studio, Berlin, MD 2014 Art Along The Hudson at S.P.A.F, Saugerties, NY 2014 Star House Gallery, Studio Sale, Kingston, NY 2014 Varga Gallery Memorial Day Group Show, Woodstock, NY 2014 Bold And Bright curated by David Barr, Artspace,Falls Church, VA 2013 Ethos of Abstraction -Nina Isabelle/Lucienne Weinberger, Stray Cat Gallery, Bethel, NY 2013 The Garden Cafe, Woodstock, NY 2013 Diagnosis Artist , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Half Your Age , Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY 2013 Barrett Art Center, Kinetic , Poughkeepsie, NY 2013 Art Foray, Wired Gallery, High Falls, NY 2013 Home Grown , Hole In The Wall Gallery, Mechanicsburg, PA 2013 Outer Expressions of Inner Mayhem , solo show, Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA 2012 Bits & Pieces , The Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA 2012 Cool Cats , Hole in The Wall Gallery, Mechanicsburg, PA 2012 Fall Season Show, Greenpoint Gallery,Brooklyn, NY ​2012 IDIOM , Unison at Water Street Market Gallery, New Paltz, NY 2012 The Maltese Falcon, Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY 2012 Trash Art Gallery at The Metropolis Collective, Mechanicsburg, PA 2012 The Handmade Photograph , Mills Pond House Gallery, Smithtown, Long Island, NY 2012 Sex 7 , Projekt 30, NYC 2012 Cornell St. Studio, Kingston, NY 2012 Varga Gallery, Goddess Show, Woodstock, NY 2012 Erotica , Tivoli Artists co-op, Tivoli, NY 2012 Birds of a Feather , Varga Gallery. Woodstock, NY 2011 Paintings / Drawings, Lovebird Studios, Rosendale, NY 2011 Season Show, Art @ Home, Kingston, NY 2010 Wings Gallery, Rosendale, NY 2007 South Main Studios, Gunnison, CO 2007 Paragon Gallery, Crested Butte, CO 2005 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2004 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2003 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2002 The Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 1999 Jewett Center, Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT 1998 Sundance Gallery, Sundance, UT 1998 Weber State College, Weber, UT 1992 P.S.A.D Student Gallery, Lancaster, PA 1991 P.S.A.D. Student Gallery, Lancaster, PA 1990 Centre Film Lab, State College, PA 1989 Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania, State College, PA 1988 Pennsylvania State Capital Building, Harrisburg, PA ​ Solo Exhibitions 2021 Psychic Self-Defense, Artlife Institute Kingston, Kingston, NY 2019 Remarkable New Locations, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2018 We Can't Tell What We're Doing, HiLo, Catskill, NY 2018 The Beast, The Mothership, Woodstock, NY 2017 Nina A. Isabelle at HiLo Art, Catskill, NY 2016 Animal Maximalism , Green Kill, Kingston, NY 2016 Hyperactive Installation at The Shirt Factory, Kingston, NY 2016 The Pain Project , Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY 2014 The Random Community Generator , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Inner Mayhem , Metropolis Collective, Harrisburg, PA 2002 Nina Isabelle, Gunnison Art Center, Gunnison, CO 1999 Handmade Photographs , Bibliotheque, Salt Lake City, UT Performance 2022 Livestream - Nina Isabelle & Adriana Magaña at Jennifer Zackin's Upstate Art Open Studio, July 2022 2021 Building as Being / Construction as Performance - IV Castellanos & Nina Isabelle at Rosekill Performance Art Farm, June 2021 2020 EQUINOX, An Emergency of Joy, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Illuminating Intangibles, Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Land Lines with Jennifer Zackin, C.X. Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, Secret City, Woodstock, NY 2018 Whistle Portraits with Linda Mary Montano & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY 2018 Embodying The Outer Bodies / Force Yourself To Be Good Panoply Performance Laboratory , Brooklyn, NY 2018 Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives, Feminist Art Group, www.bulletspace.org , NYC 2018 The Hymn Warp Transducer, Paul McMahon's Bedstock, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY 2018 Muscular Bonding, New Genres Arts Festival, Living Arts, with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, Tulsa, OK 2018 M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus,) with Esther Neff, Beth Neff, Kaia Giljia, 3dward Sharp, and Adriana Disman, in St. Louis, MO 2018 Piano Portraits with Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo in Catskill, NY 2018 Beast Conjuring, The Mothership, Woodstock, NY 2017 We Are The Secret Garden , The Stable Yard at Ernest, Anna, & Ming's in Kingston, NY 2017 Just Situations with FAG, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2017 Ungovernable Zone by Anarko Art Lab at Secret Garden Art Festival at Ft. Tilden, NYC 2017 MOTHERING , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY 2017 If You Don't Go Out In The Woods , Legacy Fatale, Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY 2017 oUT iN tHE zONE, Anarchist Art Festival #11, Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 The Fabric of Women's Space-Time, The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 Stages , Green Kill Gallery, Kingston, NY 2017 Embarrassed of the Whole, Time Travel Research, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY 2016 Mock The Chasm , Art / Life Institute, Kingston, NY 2016 Laundry Loops at JOB /// IV Soldier's F.A.G. Feminist Art Group at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY 2016 Q: INFORMATICUS, P)REPARING THE REAL , The Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY 2016 Performances Sketches / Clara Diamond's Residency at Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY 2015 The Q: Entity , The Art/Life Institute, Kingston, NY 2015 The Silent Mass Generator Workshop , Grace Exhibition Space Archive, Kingston, NY 2005 Mirror , Taylor Hall at Western State College University, Gunnison, CO 2002 What Do We Have? / Vanity / Death, Jaquelynne Brodeur & Nina Isabelle, The Gunnison Art Center, Gunnison, CO 1999 The Dischordant Student , Jewett Center, Salt Lake City, UT ​ Video Production 2022 Documenting Process: Cai & Le Xi 2022 Documenting Process: Josh Babu 2022 Steve's Dream 2021 Documenting Process: Shola Cole AKA Pirate Jenny 2019 Documenting Process: Linda Mary Montano 2019 Documenting Process: The Architecture of a Stream by Valerie Sharp 2018 Documenting Process: Decompositions by Brian McCorkle 2018 Seemripper https://vimeo.com/296678389 2018 Video Manifestation System, Human Trash Dump, https://archive.org/details/htdc005 2016 The Eucharist Machine, 4:48, https://vimeo.com/189071199 2016 Certain Solutions For Solving Problems, 8:40, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltIadB4FuFI 2016 Domestic Loops, 6:20, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeEYUtCZbKY 2016 Mother Vs. God, 0:47, https://vimeo.com/176222556 2016 IBM- Tech City Re-Vision , 0:55 https://vimeo.com/182476408 2016 The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy , 2:43, https://vimeo.com/182594886 2016 Locational Trauma Transform, 2:54 https:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crlDcMZfy1M 2016 Performance Sketch at Art/Life Institute https://youtu.be/XzNUWDwvOTk 2016 The Story Of Terror / Ax In The Stump https://vimeo.com/176227354 2016 Building Connections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YdGO-7zrSY 2016 C O D E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcxJ4pHX8WE 2015 Feeding The Entity https://vimeo.com/140719399 2015 Siblings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LR4ErG0Khvc 2015 Q:Entity at Art/Life Institute https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5joer_gcyKQ ​ Curating / Hosting / Facilitating 2021- 2022 Sound of Ceres- facilitate set construction & studio space for production of Emerald Sea 2022 - BIRTHDAYARAMA - Linda Mary Montano's 21 hr. Zoom Birthday Party 2021 Michelle Temple 2021 Shola Cole- Drawing, Welding, & Construction for Time Travelers 2020 Notice Recording presents New Music & Free Jazz, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2020 Social Dissonance, Paul McMahon, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 FUTURE: Shola Cole AKA Pirate Jenny, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Speed, Light, Motion & Gesture: Video Installation by Josh Babu, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Infinity Within & Without, Cai Xi and Le Xi, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Hurray! The Gland Doctors Graduate. Linda Mary Montano, Amanda Heidel, Arielle Ponder, Megumi Naganoma, and Lynn Herring 2019 Lorene Bouboushian & The Undoing And Doing Collective, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 The Architecture of A Stream by Valerie Sharp, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2019 Public Vortex Weaving by Jennifer Zackin, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 The Malleability of Memory by Ernest Goodmaw, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 Eleven Modes of Decomposition by Brian McCorkle, Three Phase Center, Stone Rodge, NY 2018 The Obstructionist: Empathy Blinders & Dramatic Object Making with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows / Griess, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2018 Thinkers & Doers Feminist Workgroup with Ernest Goodmaw, Havarah Zawoluk and Anna Hafner, Three Phase Center, Stone Ridge, NY 2017 The Shirt Factory Centennial Performance & 3rd Floor Pop Up, The Shirt Factory, Kingston, NY 2016 Animal Maximalism Performances at Green Kill, Green Kill, NY 2016 Alice Teeple, Now Is Real , Star House Gallery, NY 2015 Owen Harvey, The Local Gallery, Kingston, NY 2015 Recent Paintings by Chad Gallion , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2015 Through The Lens : The Sudbury Photo Show, Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2014 Adam & Jeff: An Abstract Painter and His Mentor , Star House Gallery, KIngston, NY 2014 Parallel Places: Owen Harvey / Michael Hunt , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2014 The Cedar Tavern Phone Booth Show, Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Isaac Abrams / Kelly Bickman , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Narrative , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Artist Talk: Kerry Mueller , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY 2013 Diagnosis: Artist , Star House Gallery, Kingston, NY Bibliography - Widman, Theresa. "Nina Isabelle - Artist, Thinker, Observer." I want What She Has . 2 Aug. 2021. Podcast. - Beetle & Freedom Walker. The Black Meta- Psychic Self-Defense: Artist, Nina Isabelle" 4 May. 2021. Podcast. Radio Kingston WKNY. -Santullo, Kerry. “‘Meet The Makers - 5 Minutes with Artist Nina Isabelle.’ "Children's Museum of the Arts New York, 21 Oct. 2020, cmany.org/blog/view/5-minutes-artist-nina-isabelle/ . - Hynes Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, and Danny Potocki. "E-talk with Nina A. Isabelle." YouTube. YouTube, 15 Oct. 2020. Web. 22 Dec. 2020. -"The Shape of a Feeling & the Language of Organizational Structures." The Esthetic Apostle. October 2019. Web https://www.estheticapostle.com/the-shape-of-a-feeling -https://www.greenearts.org/no-nudes-no-sunsets-a-photography-exhibition-opens-august-11/ - Varalla, Adriana. "12th Annual NYC Anarchist Art Festival." /anarchistbookfair.net/sites/default/files/Anarko%20Lab%202018%20PRESS%20RELEASE.pdf - Neff, Esther Marveta. "New Genres at Living Arts Tulsa." Blog Post. 7 March. 2018. Web. -Neff, Esther Marveta. "Muscular Bonding." Blog Post. 25 Jan. 2018. Web -Bresnan, Debra, "Activating Perception - Nina A. Isabelle." MAD Kingston. May 2017. Web -"GALERII Eesti Performance'i Grupp Non Grata Esines New Yorgi Anarhismi Festivalil."Õhtuleht. N.p., 24 May 2017. Web. 26 May 2017. - Elissa Garay, "Kingston: Capital of Culture." Chronogram. March 2017: p. Print. - Mills Messner, Heather. "Featured Artist Nina Isabelle." Aife Media Fall/Winter 2016: p.22-23. Print - Josh, Ryder, and Rutigliano Dario. "ARTiculAction Art Review // Special Issue." Issuu. Articulaction Art Review, Jan. 2016. Web. - Rutigliano, Dario, and Josh Ryder. "Nina Isabelle." ARTiculAction Art Review Jan. 2016: 124-49. Print. - Isabelle, Nina A. "Fashion Trends." Goodlife Youth Journal 5.1 (2016): p.20. Print. - George, James. "Nina Isabelle at Falls Church Arts, Bold & Bright." Arlington Art Examiner. 2014. Web. - Malcolm, Timothy. "Stumps For The Outsider." Record Online. Times Herald-Record, 13 Sept. 2013. Web. - Gussin, Bruce. "If It Isn't Not Broken Don't Unfix It." Blog post. Life and How to Live It. 5 Dec. 2010. Web. ​ ​ Residency 2006 Artist in Residence, Gunnison Art Center Summer Residency Program, Gunnison, CO ​ Workshops 2018 Movement Metaphors Time Traveling Workshop, Healing + Art / Radical Domesticity, Kingston, NY 2017 Experimental Archery & Mark Making, Rosekill, Rosendale, NY 2017 Metaphors of Movement, Body Systems, Disease, and Society, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY 2015 The Silent Mass Generator Workshop with Clara Diamond, GES Archive 411 Studio, Kingston, NY Teaching 2014-2016 Photography, Hudson Valley Sudbury School Photography CO-OP, Kingston, NY 2016 Art History & Ideas, HVSS Art History CO-OP, Kingston, NY 2016 Introduction to Digital Photography, The Shirt Factory, Kingston, NY 2003-2006 Modern Dance, Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 2006 Oil Painting Workshop, Crested Butte Center of the Arts, Crested Butte, CO 2006 Oil Painting Workshop, Gunnison Arts Center, Gunnison, CO 1988-1990 Kids Photography and Dark Room, Woodward Camp, Woodward, PA ​ ​ References -https://cmany.org/blog/view/5-minutes-artist-nina-isabelle/ -Hynes Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, and Danny Potocki. "E-talk with Nina A. Isabelle." YouTube. YouTube, 15 Oct. 2020. Web. 22 Dec. 2020. - anarchistbookfair.net -https://www.greenearts.org/no-nudes-no-sunsets-a-photography-exhibition http://www.greenearts.org/patricia-fields-artfashion-show-comes-to-catskill/ https://madkingston.org/2017/05/09/nina-a-isabelle/ http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9bbde55ac06fd4ebf2c0424ae&id=ef278b43c7 http://bangkokundergroundcinema.com/day-3-bridge/ https://justsituations.wordpress.com/ http://www.ivcastellanos.com/feminist-art-group/ http://romansusan.org/following/all/romansusan.org/Property https://madkingston.org/reframed-ritual-nina-isabelle-3715/ https://www.timeout.com/san-diego/things-to-do/the-dead-are-not-quiet-and-the-haunted-art-of-t-jefferson-carey http://artisbeing.com/blog/2016/9/28/san-diego-art-institute-the-dead-are-not-quiet-gallery-exhibiton https://greenkill.org/2016/10/12/nina-isabelle/ http://www.artlifekingston.com/blank-e19y5 http://cicamuseum.com/artist-and-location/ http://www.jennidachase.com/2016/09/21/sn-participates-in-the-cica-artist-location-exhibition-in-gyeonggi-do-korea/ ​

  • Multidisciplinary Artist | New York | Nina A. Isabelle

    Nina Isabelle HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Addition Equals Subtraction, 43.50 x 62.25, house paint and flashe on canvas, 2017 Nina A Isabelle performing in Temporary Ungovernable Zone for Anarko Art Lab at Ft. Tilden, NYC. Photo by Jaime Rosenfeld RECENT / CURRENT / UPCOMING -PSYCHIC SELF-DEFENSE Sculpture, Installation, & Demonstration at Art/Life Kingston, May 1st - 29th, 2021 -Imagined Performances read by IV Castellanos at Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY, February 12, 202 1 - Kerry Santullo interviews Nina Isabelle for NYC Children's Museum of Art "Meet The Makers ," October 21, 2020 -Spheres of Perception & Value, Virtual Presentation, Hynes Institute for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Iona College , September 21, 2020 -Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation , Grace Exhibition Space, NYC , May 1, 2020 -Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, Grace Exhibition Space, NYC . May 15, 2020 -EQUINOX , An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 -The Ear , Brooklyn, NY, August 23, 2019 -Remarkable New Locations - Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, May 18th - June 15th, 2019 - PARALLEL -104 Meserole Street, Brooklyn NY, Saturday, March 23rd,2019- 7:PM -documentation discussion panel with LiVEART.US featuring Emergency INDEX at Queens Museum , February 17, 2019 2:00-5:00 -Emp athy Blinders by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 -As Far As The Hart Can See / In Honor of , The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts , NYC, October 20th, 2018 -actLife , Linda Mary Montano, Nye Ffarrabas, Cai Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Lee Xi & Sharon Myers, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, August 24 -Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity, Movement Metaphors Workshop, Kingston, NY, August 24, 2018 -NO NUDES NO SUNSETS , August 11 - September 22, 2018, Green County Council on the Arts , Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits, Linda Montano & Nina Isabelle, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY, July 28 - DRAMATIC OBJECT MAKING / EMPATHY BLINDERS with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows Griess, THREE PHASE , Sept.1, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - WE CAN'T TELL WHAT WE'RE DOING, HiLo , July 20, 2018 - August 26, 2018, Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits , Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY June 10, 2018 -ANIMALIA , Anarchist Art Festival, Judson Memorial Church, NYC, June 8 2018 -GUTTER HANGER w/ Lorene Bouboushian & Friends, THREE PHASE , 1:PM-DARK, May 27, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - EMBODYING THE OUTER BODIES: a demonstration of low-level energetic vacuum form technologies 7:PM, May 24, 2018, PPL , Brooklyn, NY - Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives , Feminist Art Group, www.bulletspace.org , May 6, 2018, NYC -Hymn Warp Transducer at Paul McMahon' s Bedstock Exhibit, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY, April 15, 2018 -New Genres at Living Arts in Tulsa,OK , March 2-3, 2018 -MUSCULAR BONDING at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus)- Feb 15 - March 5, St. Louis, MO -The Video Manifestation System released by Human Trash Dump - February 26, 2018 -PIANO PORTRAITS By Linda Mary Montano with Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo , Catskill, NY, Feb. 11, 2018 -BEAST CONJURING by Nina Isabelle , The Mothership , Woodstock, NY, Jan16-21, 2018 http://paulmcmahon.tv/mothership -MKUVM , Human Trash Dump, November 27, 2017 https://archive.org/details/htdc002 -The Bedroom , 4th Iteration by The Women Artist Team, Holland Tunnel Gallery , Brooklyn, NY , October 20- November 12 -Patricia Field's International Art / Fashion Show , Joe's Garage, October 6, 2017, Catskill, NY www.greenearts.org -CENTENNIAL:SHE , Greene County Council on the Arts, October 7 - November 11, 2017 - The Shirt Factory Centennial Celebration- Performance / Open Studio , Kingston, NY, September 16, 2017 -F.A.G. Slumber Party , Nina's House & Yard Studio, Hurley, NY September 4-6, 2017 - We Are The Secret Garden: An Evening of Performance, Kingston, NY September 26, 2017 - The Bedroom , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea, July 23- Aug. 7, 201 7 -Just Situations , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY, July 23, 2017 https://justsituations.wordpress.com -Temporary Ungovernable Zone , Anarcho Art Lab / ARTINYC, Ft. Tilden, NY July 8, 2017 -Experimental Archery Workshop , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 10, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com - Mothering , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 3, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com/ - N Y C Anarchist Performance Art Festival #11 , The Judson Memorial Church , NYC, May 12, 2017 -The Fabric Of Women's Space-Time , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingsotn, NY, May 13, 2017 - UNITY , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, N, May 6-13, 2017 -The Unstitute's Projection Room ,Catalunya, Spain, August 2017, http://www.theunstitute.org/Projection.Room.html - STAGES , Performance by Clara Diamond with Valerie Sharp & Nina Isabelle, GREENKILL , APRIL 15, 2017 -P R O P E R T Y , R O M A N S U S A N / RPWRHS, CHICACO, IL, APRIL 1-30, 2017, www.romansusan.org - Bangkok Underground Film Festival , Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand, March 4-12, 2017 -SHORTCUT TO HELL , January 22, 2017, Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY www.otionfront.com -HiLo Art , April 2017, Catskill, NY https://www.hilocatskill.com -EotW (Embarrassed Of The Whole) February 4, 2017, Panoply Lab, Brooklyn, NY http://www.panoplylab.org -Mock The Chasm, November 12, 2016, Art/Life Institute Kingston, NY http://www.artlifekingston.com/ -JOB /// IV Soldier's Feminist Art Group at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY -San Diego Art Institute - The Dead Are Not Quiet , San Diego, CA October 1-31 -Animal Maximalism , Green Kill, Kingston, NY, October 1-15 www.greenkill.org -POLITRICKS: Theories & Other Conspiracies , October 14, Ellipsis Art, Philadelphia, PA -Artist and Location , September 23-October 9, Czong Institute For Contemporary Art, Gimpo Korea, www.cicamuseum.com -Jurnquist Coloring Book Show , September 24, Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin

  • MKULTRA / MIND CONTROL RABBIT

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE GIANT MK ULTRA MIND CONTROL RABBIT PLAYS MKUVM Duration: 14 min. 44 sec. Created February 2017 The MKUVM audio file functions as human behavior modification designed to disarm protective fear-based reality programming in order to insert dangerous encrypted emotional directives disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from ex-lovers. The audio file utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. ​ Tags: Electronic Harassment, Magnetoencephalography, Mind Control, Behavior Control, LSD, CIA,MK/Ultra, Physicochemical Investigations, Voicemail, Infrasound, Secure Room, Microwave Auditory Effect, Bobolocapnine, Atlanta Federal Penitentiary Prisoner Experiments, Richard Bandler Murder Trial, NLP, Neuro-linguistic Programming, Ex-Lovers, Energy Weapons, Sonic Weapons, Satan, Behavior Modification, The Manchurian Candidate, Brainwash, Backmasking, Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments.

  • LANDLINES AT CX SILVER GALLERY | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LANDLINES Performance by Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin at CX Silver Gallery in Brattleboro, VT. August 26, 2018 An interactive type of immersion-therapy, Landlines invites viewers & participants to make their own meaning out of actions and gestures happening within a sea of dissonance. How do we cultivate the cultural phenomena of communication while agendas of power and dominance try to hijack our semiotic proclivity with fake news and ad campaigns designed to entrench us in divisive notions of entitlement and correctness? When lines of communication become connected to fear, anger, and resentment, how do we clear and reground them to empathy and grace? ​

  • REMARKABLE NEW LOCATIONS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... REMARKABLE NEW LOCATIONS Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle CX Silver Gallery, May- June 2019 Out of gallery Remarkable New Locations is a series of interactive art objects inspired by Nye Ffarrabas's poetry and produced by Nina Isabelle using a car as a printing press. The objects are interactive as they invite the viewer to engage in marking and remaking the dry erase surface as a way to facilitate perceptions of process, language, and action. The printing process involved inking each plate individually and pressing it into each sheet by driving a car over it to emboss the plate image into the saturated paper. Each piece was rolled over ten times with a car revealing various degrees of chance in the imagery. The original monoprint plate was produced using hand-etched plexiglass. Using black printmaking ink on 100% cotton 22x30 Arches 88 printmaking paper, the prints were individually processed, then hand painted using ink, gouache, and acrylic paint to highlight and color code the vowels using purple As, yellow Es, orange Is, blue Os, and green Us. The final layer is a hand cut transparent material affixed to the image surface machine stitched with orange thread. Nye Ffarrabas (formerly Bici Forbes and Bici Hendricks) has been an artist for 60 years and a poet for 80. She participated in Happenings beginning in 1961, as part of the Fluxus scene. In 1962 she interviewed several artists including Roy Lichtenstein, Bob Watts and Ivan Karp. In 1965, she established her own publishing company, the Black Thumb Press. Nye/Bici had her first solo show at Judson Gallery in 1966 and the next year performed Ordeals with Carolee Schneemann. In the 60s and 70s, Nye/Bici participated in many of the Annual Avant Garde Festival of New York events coordinated by Charlotte Moorman. Starting in 1964, Nye/Bici compiled journals as conceptual art with Geoff Hendricks, a series known as The Friday Book of White Noise which contains many seeds for her event scores. In 2019 Nye completed a mobius-strip-shaped infinite event score as a performance, installation and wall-piece. Out of gallery

  • 650 ml. OF LUNG PUSS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... 650 ML. OF LUNG PUSS A seventeen-day artlife performance at Westchester Medical Center's Maria Fareri Children's Hospital in Valhalla, NY December 18, 2019 - January 3, 2020 650 ml. of Lung Puss was a seventeen-day performance initiated by a dire circumstance that ultimately demonstrated a quantum aspect of artlife processes. Influenced by my friend and artlife colleague Linda Mary Montano, the performance inspired a deeper understanding of a performance process that summons elemental energies from a nonlocational power source. These energies exist in a state of quantum superposition and can be programmed using intention, determination, focus, and sacrifice, to transmute pain, suffering, and trauma into tolerance, endurance, resilience, self awareness, control, forgiveness, grace, and gratitude. The performance began on December 18th when I carried my near lifeless and blue 94lb. daughter across a large, dark, silent, windy, and cold parking lot into the hospital's emergency room. The energies that fueled this difficult task were conjured from a deeply derived performative physical power cultivated by all mothers collectively throughout eternal time combined with the tension building from a deadlocked schism between my intuition and the medical authorities. In the past two days, we had been sent home from the emergency room and a pediatrician's office. Meanwhile, my daughter had developed sepsis from Scarlett Fever, Pneumonia, and a pleural effusion in her left lung. Our hospital performance engaged members of our close community, artlife collaborators and colleagues, friends and family, and the larger medical community of ambulance drivers, EMTs, emergency room attendants, nurses,doctors, phlebotomists, surgeons, lab and x-ray technicians, infectious disease specialists, sanitation specialists, medical administrators, and so on. Together, we collectively transformed into an unintentional ensemble performing actions together as our best selves in order to save a child's life. We embodied multiple and often simultaneous roles and embraced the fluctuating spaces between these modes. We performed as mothers, organizers, brothers, partners, distractors, whisperers of encouragement, visitors, tear swallowers, fear fighters, candle lighters, gift givers, keepers of tempers, story book readers, temperature takers, practitioners of patience, hand holders, phone callers, researchers, organizers, group texters, medicine givers, vomit bucket holders, comforters, food providers, errand runners, and healers. On the final day of our hospital performance, Linda texted "rest art!!!" to our group. We were finally able to go home, perform rest, and RESTART. This performance demonstrated that art and life function as entangled dimensions through subtle quantum artlife processes. We learned that approaches effective in art and performance dimensions are also effective in dimensions of life and other realities, and that intentions and actions occurring within one dimension simultaneously reflect, impact, and are made evident in multiple ways throughout multiple dimensions. Engaging with life circumstances through performative art mechanisms allows us to translate the diverse array of creative skills derived from our disciplined artlife practices, (our responsive, intuitive, reflexive, mindful, and conceptual abilities,) into cognitive modes of awareness that inform the new life patterns necessary to thrive as artists in life. Through this post-conceptualizing processes, we gain the ability to sidestep linear chronologies and reframe the concepts of our engagements post-performatively as a way to articulate with the personal mechanisms of awareness and control necessary to make meanings and choices that fortify our collective artlives in new and beneficial ways. List of Performers: Paul DeVincent, Ernest Goodmaw, Sylvia Hallibelle, Chris Hallman, Erik Hokanson, Eric Hurliman, Ulysses Hurliman, Bg Isabelle, Ed Isabelle, Kate Isabelle, Lou Isabelle, Louie Isabelle-DeVincent, Margie Isabelle, Nina Isabelle, Brian McCorkle, Jill McDermid, Paul McMahon, Linda Mary Montano, Ever Peacock, Mor Pipman, Valerie Sharp, Maureen Sharp, Luke Stence, Jennifer Zackin, and Havarah Zawaluk, many anonymous medical professionals, hospital workers, elementary school teachers, school nurses, community mothers and children.

  • Nina A. Isabelle // The Sperfund Revising Project

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SUPERFUND RE-VISIONING PROJECT 2016 The Superfund Re-Visioning Project is an experimental artistic process that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are one hundred and seventeen Superfund Sites. This project focuses on transforming and energetically remediating those sites by redirecting potential energy toward alternate futures using combinations of creative actions including site specific performance and sound explorations, sculpture, writing, and visual art including drawing, painting, photography, and video. Superfund sites are polluted locations requiring a long-term response to clean up hazardous material and contaminations. CERCLA authorized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create a list of such locations, which are placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). CERCLA stands for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, known also as Superfund. It was passed in 1980 in response to some alarming and decidedly unacceptable hazardous waste practices and management going on in the 1970s. While CERCLA and other Government agencies have been able to compile large lists, testing, and data, their processes often lack resolve and can be prohibitively expensive. Environmental contaminations such as those found in many of the New York State Superfund Sites have been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global warming. Three New York State Superfund sites have been preliminarily re-visioned In order to illustrate the process of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project and to function as examples for interested artists and community members to consider. The preliminary Superfund site re-visions include the Boices Lane Office Depot building in Kingston, NY., the former IBM Industrial Complex in Kingston, NY, and an archived Superfund site located in West Hurley, NY called Numrich Arms that operated as a weapons and ammunition manufacturing facility. IBM / Tech City Re-Vision September 2016 - This Video is part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project and works directly with the archived superfund site located at the IBM Tech City Industrial Complex location in Kingston, NY. Dance- Lucie Parker ​ ​ The Superfund Re-Visioning Project offers users an effective format to develop new personal and social systems of change that sidestep outmoded financial, political, industrial, and institutional systems. The effectiveness of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project lies in its ability to incorporate reflexive, intuitive, and instinctive responses, informed through creative processes, that can direct psychic energy towards creating beneficial shifts in physical locations. ​ Re-visioning processes give us the ability to alter physical locations and remediate factors, such as environmental contamination, in profound ways that can redirect the future of our planet. By engaging in practices that facilitate access to nonlinear spacetime, we can collect data from both past and future timelines to inform realtime re-visioning. Once locational re-vision occurs, physical action performed (on location or remotely) permanently anchors the re-visioned Superfund site firmly within a newly formed multilocational dimension of spacetime and possibilities. ​ To date, three NY State Superfund Sites have been re-visioned. Planning is currently underway to further the development of this project. Please contact Nina Isabelle at nina@ninaisabelle.com to learn about opportunities to engage. ​ ​ CURRENT SITE REVISIONS INCLUDE: 1. BOICES LANE OFFICE DEPOT The Office Depot Superfund Site has been re-visioned as a future bio dome for butterflies. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 2816 State environmental officials have added the Boices Lane plaza where Office Depot used to operate to a list of Superfund sites that pose a threat to public health. The Department of Environmental Conservation, in a notification dated Oct. 21, said the contamination was found in an area of the property where there previously was a dry cleaner. “Based on investigations the primary contaminants of concern include tetrachlorethylene (PCE) and its degradation products in the groundwater, soil, soil vapor and/or indoor air,” the department wrote. 2. IBM / TECH CITY KINGSTON The archived IBM Superfund site has been re-visioned as a research and treatment center for those who have lost the ability to communicate telepathically. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 4011 The condemned IBM / Tech City complex is a superfund site located along Neighborhood Rd in Kingston, NY. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as IBM / Tech City because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. IIBM is currently registered as an archived superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up action or further investigation at this time. 3. NUMRICH GUN PARTS CORPORATION Numrich Gun Parts Corporation has been re-visioned as the future archaeological dig site revealing artifacts that will implicate technologies role in the destruction of humans. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 3016 Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is a weapons and ammunition manufacturing plant and distribution center located in West Hurley, NY. that had been investigated for lead contamination of nearby residential water wells. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as Numrich Gun Parts Corporation because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is currently registered as an archived Superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up, action, or further investigation at this time. The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell Burns By Proxy September 2016 - The Giant Candle Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy is a video spell designed as part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project. This video works remotely with an undisclosed location in Ulster County, NY that is the subject of industrial solvent contamination, death threats, labor rights violations, hauntings, and suicide by forklift. The Giant Candle burns by proxy to cleanse the location remotely. Voice- Brittany Holly Hannah / Dance- Lucie Parker. LIST OF NEW YORK STATE SUPERFUND SITES (from https://www.epa.gov/superfund/search-superfund-sites-where-you-live ) ​ 1. American Thermostat Co., Greene NY The American Thermostat Co. site is located in South Cairo, New York. Thermostat manufacturing for small appliances led to volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in the ground water. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201350 2. Griffiss Air Force Base, Oneida NY The Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB) site is located in Rome, New York. The 3,552-acre base began operations in 1943 under the Air Combat Command and served as home to various Air Force operations over the years. On July 1, 1970, the 416th Bombardment Wing of the Strategic Air Command was activated with the mission of maintenance and implementation of both effective air refueling operations and long-range bombardment capability, but in 1993 and 1995, Griffiss AFB was designated for realignment under the Base Realignment and Closure Act which resulted in the deactivation of the 416th Bombardment Wing in September 1995. While active base operations have now ceased and been relocated to other areas across the county, the Rome Laboratory, Northeast Air Defense Sector and the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS) still operate at the base. During the 50 years of operation, hazardous wastes were generated from various activities including: aircraft operation; testing and maintenance; firefighting exercises; discharge of munitions; landfill operations; and research and development activities. Over the years, these wastes were disposed of in landfills and dry wells located across the base which led to investigations into contamination that could pose threats to public health and the environment. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202438 ​ 3. Love Canal, Niagara NY The Love Canal site (Site) is located in Niagara Falls, New York. It was one of two initial excavations in what was to be a canal to provide inexpensive hydroelectric power for industrial development around the turn of the 20th century. The abandoned excavation, partially filled with water, was used largely for recreational purposes. The canal was about 9,750 feet long and ranged in depth from 10 to 25 feet. Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corporation (now Occidental Chemical Corporation, or OXY) disposed of over 21,000 tons of hazardous chemicals into the abandoned Love Canal between 1942 and 1953, contaminating soil and groundwater. In 1953, the landfill was covered and leased to the Niagara Falls Board of Education (NFBE). Afterwards, the area near the covered landfill was extensively developed, including construction of an elementary school, as well as many residential properties. The fenced 70-acre Site includes the original 16-acre hazardous waste landfill and a 40-acre cap, as well as a drainage system and leachate collection and treatment system that are in place and operating. ​ Beginning in the 1970s, local residents noticed foul odors and chemical residues and experienced increased rates of cancer and other health problems. In 1978 and 1980, President Carter declared two federal environmental emergencies for the Site, and about 950 families were evacuated from their homes within a 10-square-block area surrounding the landfill. This area was eventually referred to as the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) and was subsequently divided into seven areas as related to habitability concerns. The severity of the Site’s contamination ultimately led to the creation of federal legislation to manage the disposal of hazardous waste. This legislation was named the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Law) of 1980. In September 1983, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) listed the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and began to work with New York State (NYS) to clean up the Site. In 1999, the EPA and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) completed remedy construction in 1999. The EPA deleted the Site from the NPL in 2004. As a result of the extent of the contamination at the Site, the response action was addressed in several stages focused on landfill containment with leachate collection; treatment and disposal; excavation and treatment of the sewer and creek sediment and other wastes; cleanup of the 93rd Street School soils; the purchase, maintenance and rehabilitation of properties; and, other short-term cleanup actions. As a result of these cleanup actions, the Site no longer presents a threat to human health and the environment. In September 2004, the EPA removed the Site from the Superfund program’s NPL. As a result of the revitalization efforts of the Love Canal Area Revitalization Agency (LCARA), new homeowners have moved into the habitable areas of the Love Canal. More than 260 formerly abandoned homes in the affected area were rehabilitated and sold to new residents, creating a viable new neighborhood. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201290 ​ 4. Hudson River PCBs, Washington, NY ​ General Electric's pollution of the Hudson River with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between 1947 and 1977 is the major historic contamination of the Hudson River Valley. This pollution caused a range of harmful effects to wildlife and people who eat fish from the river or drink the water. In response to this contamination, activists protested in various ways. Musician Pete Seeger founded the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the Clearwater Festival to draw attention to the problem. The activism led to the site being designated as one of the superfund sites. Other kinds of pollution, including mercury contamination and sewage dumping, have also caused problems. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollution_of_the_Hudson_River ​ 5. Onondaga Lake Onondaga, NY ​ Onondaga Lake is a lake in Central New York located northwest of Syracuse, New York. The southeastern end of the lake and the southwestern shore abut industrial areas and expressways; the northeastern shore and northwestern end border a series of parks and museums.[1] Onondaga watershed Although it is near the Finger Lakes region, it is not traditionally counted as one of the Finger Lakes. Onondaga Lake is a dimictic lake,[2] meaning that the lake water completely mixes from top to bottom twice a year. The lake is 4.6 miles long and 1 mile wide making a surface area of 4.6 square miles.[2] The maximum depth of the lake is 63 feet with an average depth of 35 feet.[3] Its drainage basin has a surface area of 642 square kilometers, encompassing Syracuse, Onondaga County except the eastern and northern edges, the southeastern corner of Cayuga County and the Onondaga Nation Territory,[4] and supports approximately 450,000 people.[5] Onondaga Lake has two natural tributaries that contribute approximately 70% of the total water flow to the lake. These tributaries are: Ninemile Creek and Onondaga Creek. The Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant (METRO) contributes 20% of the annual flow.[3][6] No other lake in the United States receives as much of its inflow as treated wastewater.[7] The other tributaries, which include Ley Creek, Bloody Brook, Harbor Brook, Sawmill Creek, Tributary 5A, and East Flume, contribute the remaining 10% of water flow into the lake.[3][6] The tributaries flush the lake out about four times a year.[5] Onondaga Lake is flushed much more rapidly than most other lakes.[6] The lake flows to the northwest[8] and discharges into Seneca River which combines with the Oneida River to form the Oswego River, and ultimately ends up in Lake Ontario.[2] The lake is considered sacred within the indigenous territory of the Onondaga Nation. The Onondaga people lost control of the lake to New York State following the American Revolutionary War. During the late 19th century, European-Americans built many resorts along the lake's shoreline, as it was a destination of great beauty. The Onondaga Nation still has religious and cultural on the Shores of the Lake today. With the industrialization of the region, much of the lake's shoreline was developed; domestic and industrial waste, due to industry and urbanization, led to the severe degradation of the lake. Unsafe levels of pollution led to the banning of ice harvesting as early as 1901. In 1940, swimming was banned, and in 1970 fishing was banned due to mercury contamination.[2][5] Mercury pollution is still a problem for the lake today.[3] Despite the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1973 and the closing of the major industrial polluter in 1986, Onondaga Lake is still one of the most polluted lakes in the United States. Several initiatives, including a 15-year multi-stage program currently under way, have been recently[when?] undertaken to clean up the lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onondaga_Lake 6. Pfohl Brothers Landfill, Erie, NY (REMOVED) ​ The Pfohl Brothers Landfill site is located in Cheektowaga, New York, approximately one mile east of the Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The privately-owned landfill received municipal and industrial waste between 1932 and 1971. After the cleanup of the site, EPA took it off of the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2008. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201751 7. Applied Environmental Services, Nassau, NY ​ The Applied Environmental Services site, also known as the Shore Realty site, is located in Glenwood Landing, New York. Petrochemical facility operations contaminated site soil and groundwater. Short-term cleanups, also known as removal actions, included drum and fencing removal and liquid waste collection. Long-term cleanup – soil vapor extraction for contaminated soils and a pump-and-treat system with bioremediation for contaminated groundwater – is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202121 8. Seneca Army Depot, Seneca, NY The Seneca Army Depot Activity (SEDA) site is located in Romulus, New York. It covers 10,587 acres. The U.S. Army has operated the facility and stored and disposed of military explosives there between 1941 and 2000, when SEDA closed. Following recommendation by DoD, approval by the Base Closure Commission, the President and Congress, SEDA was approved for the 1995 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) list in October 1995. Some parts of the base have been transferred to various entities, prison and correctional authorities, as well as the Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). Current reuse plans project that most of the site property will be transferred for wildlife conservation, recreation, industrial and warehousing land uses. The site is being addressed through a Federal Facility Agreement between the Army, EPA and the State of New York. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing and it is expected to be completed in 2017. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202425 9. Black River PCBs Jefferson, NY The Black River PCBs site is located along the Black River in Champion, Carthage and West Carthage in Jefferson County, New York. The site is currently delineated as a three mile stretch of the Black River. The site consists of PCB-contaminated sediment that was a result of historical industrial discharges, and, at least in part, from wastewater discharged from the Carthage/West Carthage Water Pollution Control Facility, a sewage treatment plant. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. EPA is currently investigating site conditions. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206296 ​ 10. Dewey Loeffel Landfill, Rensselaer, NY The Dewey Loeffel Landfill Superfund site is located in Rensselaer County, New York. In the 1950s and 1960s, site was used as a disposal facility for more than 46,000 tons of industrial hazardous wastes, including solvents, waste oils, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), scrap materials, sludges and solids. Some hazardous substances, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PCBs, have migrated from the facility to underlying aquifers and downstream surface water bodies, resulting in contamination of groundwater, surface water, sediments and several species of fish. There is currently a fish consumption advisory for Nassau Lake and the surrounding water bodies. Site investigations are underway to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and inform the development of permanent cleanup options for the site. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201218 ​ 11. Hudson Technologies, Inc., Rockland, NY The Hudson Technologies, Inc. (HTI) site is located in Hillburn, New York. The 3-acre site was the location of a freon recycling facility. HTI’s activities at the facility included purifying spent refrigerant and returning it to customers. HTI began operations at the site in June 1994. Facility operations and spills contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site is being addressed through state actions. If HTI does not carry out cleanup activities, as specified, in the state enforcement agreement, EPA would finalize the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and begin the Superfund site cleanup process. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204251 12. Newtown Creek, Kings and Queens, NY On September 7, 2011, an agreement was reached between EPA and Phelps Dodge Refining Corporation, Texaco Inc., BP products North America, Brooklyn Union Gas Company d/b/a National Grid NY, ExxonMobil Oil Corporation, and, The City of New York to begin work at the Newtown Creek Superfund Site. The agreement provides for a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) and certain cost recovery relating to liabilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, (CERCLA, more commonly known as Superfund). https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/case-summary-settlement-reached-newtown-creek-superfund-site 13. Brewster Well Field, Putnam, NY The Brewster Well Field site is located in Brewster, New York. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found in the village of Brewster’s well field water distribution system in 1978. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Subsequent testing revealed a large plume of groundwater contamination. EPA traced the source of the contamination to a dry cleaner. Operators disposed of dry cleaning wastes in a dry well next to the business until 1983. Between 1978 and 1984, the Village of Brewster used several new well drilling, blending and pumping strategies to keep contaminant levels down. In 1984, the village partnered with EPA to put in a treatment system. The goal was to remove the VOCs and provide safe drinking water to about 2,000 area residents. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202153 14. Brookhaven National Laboratory (USDOE), Suffolk, NY The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is a research and development facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It covers 5,265 acres in Upton, New York. The DOE conducts research in physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and energy technologies. The lab is about 8 square miles in size. Much of the environmental contamination at the lab is from accidental spills and historical storage and disposal of chemical and radiological materials. Many cleanup activities have been completed; other cleanup efforts are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202841 15. Byron Barrel & Drum, Genesee, NY The Byron Barrel & Drum site is located in Genesee County, New York. The site is about 2 acres of an 8-acre property off of Transit Road in a rural area. The site was used as a salvage yard for heavy construction equipment; hazardous wastes were also disposed of there. Drums of chemical wastes were abandoned on site without any spill control or containment provisions. Other drums were ripped open or crushed, mixed with soil, and covered over, contaminating soil and groundwater with hazardous substances. Emergency actions to protect human health and the environment have been completed. Long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202257 16. Carroll & Dubies Sewage Disposal, Orange, NY The Caldwell Trucking Co. site is located in Fairfield Township, New Jersey. It consists of properties and groundwater contaminated by the disposal of residential, commercial and industrial septic waste. Immediate actions to protect human health and the environment and soil cleanup have been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201492 17. Cayuga County Ground Water Contamination, Cayuga, NY The Cayuga Groundwater Contamination site includes contaminated groundwater that covers about 4.8 square miles extending from Auburn to Union Springs, New York. It includes the townships of Aurelius, Fleming and Springport. The site contains mostly residential properties mixed with farmland, woodlands and commercial areas. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The General Electric Company (GE) owned and manufactured semiconductors at a facility on Genesee Street in Auburn. For a time, Powerex, Inc. a joint venture of GE and others, bought the facility and conducted similar operations there. EPA has finalized a plan to address the contaminated groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204289 18. Circuitron Corp., Suffolk, NY The Circuitron Corporation site was located at 82 Milbar Boulevard, East Farmingdale, New York. Circuitron Corporation manufactured electronic circuit boards on the 1-acre area from 1961 to 1986. The manufacturing process at the facility included drilling, screening, plating and scrubbing processes, all of which generated chemical wastes. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, soils, sediment and a building with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily 1,1,1-trichloroethane and tetrachloroethene. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air and can migrate from the soils into the groundwater. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202301 19. Claremont Polychemical Nassau, NY The Claremont Polychemical site is the former location of a manufacturer of pigments for plastics and inks. The facility operated from 1966 to 1980. The 9.5-site is located in an industrial section of Old Bethpage in Nassau County, New York. Facility operations contaminated soil, groundwater and a building with volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201338 ​ 20. Colesville Municipal Landfill, Broome, NY The Colesville Municipal Landfill site is an inactive landfill in Colesville, New York. The Town of Colesville owned and operated the 35-acre landfill from 1965 until 1969, when ownership transferred to Broome County. The landfill accepted about 9,000 tons of municipal waste each year. From 1973 to 1975, industrial wastes such as organic solvents, dyes and metals were placed in the landfill, resulting in groundwater contamination. The landfill closed in 1984. Capping of the 35-acre landfill and treatment of contaminated groundwater has significantly reduced the threat to public health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202237 ​ 21. Computer Circuits, Suffolk, NY The Computer Circuits site is located in an industrial park in Hauppauge, New York. From 1969 to 1977, Computer Circuits Corporation operated a circuit board manufacturing facility at the 2-acre property, discharged industrial wastewaters into industrial cesspools on site. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with copper and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. VOC contaminants (in particular, trichloroethylene (TCE)) were also identified at levels of concern in indoor air. Contaminants in groundwater and indoor air posed a risk to human health. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202636 ​ 22. Consolidated Iron and Metal, Orange, NY The Consolidated Iron and Metal site is an inactive car and scrap metal junkyard in Newburgh, New York. From World War I until the early 1940s, the Eureka Shipyard operated at the 7-acre site. Consolidated Iron and Metal Company’s scrap metal processing and storage operations began in the mid-1950s and continued at the site until the facility's closure in 1999. Facility operations led to soil contamination. Contaminants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204175 ​ 23. Cortese Landfill, Sullivan, NY The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867 ​ 24. The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867 25. Diaz Chemical Corporation, Orleans, NY The Diaz Chemical Corporation (Diaz Chemical) site is located in Holley, New York. The area includes the Diaz Chemical facility and parts of the surrounding residential neighborhood. Following an accidental release of a chemical mixture in 2002, members of the public complained of acute health effects. Residents voluntarily relocated from some of the homes in the neighborhood to area hotels with assistance from Diaz Chemical. In May 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assumed responsibility for the relocation expenses of the residents who remained relocated at that time, secured the site and removed contaminated materials. In June 2003, Diaz Chemical filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the facility, leaving behind large volumes of chemicals in drums and tanks. Immediate cleanup actions at the site have protected immediate threats to human health and the environment. A thermal treatment remedy was selected for the site in 2012. Design and construction efforts related to the site’s long-term cleanup are underway. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203341 ​ 26. Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal, Ulster, NY The Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal site is located in Ellenville, New York. It includes a 24-acre former scrap iron and metal reclamation facility and several nearby residential properties. About 10 acres of the site were used for scrap metal operations and battery reclamation from 1950 to 1997. In late 1997, the area was used for landfill purposes and as a tire dump before being abandoned. Following site investigations and short-term cleanups called removal actions, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place to protect human health and the environment. Operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204190 27. Endicott Village Well Field, Broome, NY The Endicott Village Well Field site is located in Endicott, New York. The site includes a Ranney Well and its zone of influence on area groundwater. The boundaries of this zone are the Susquehanna River to the south, West Main Street to the north, Grippen Park to the east and Endicott Landfill to the west. EPA detected vinyl chloride and trace amounts of other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the discharge from the Ranney Well. The landfill is the source of the contamination. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202264 ​ 28. Facet Enterprises, Inc., Chemung, NY The Facet Enterprises, Inc. Superfund site is located in Elmira Heights, Chemung County, New York. The remedy for the site includes: the excavation of contaminated soils and sediments; the construction of a ground water pump and treat system; the construction of an on-site landfill; and the implementation of institutional controls. The trigger for this third five-year review was the previous five-year review signed on September 28, 2007. Based upon reviews of the 1992 Record of Decision (ROD), operation and maintenance reports, a site visit conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) personnel on September 27, 2011, it has been determined that ground water data at the site requires further evaluation to ensure that the site-related contamination is effectively captured and treated by the existing remedy. Evaluation of the vapor intrusion exposure pathway at additional residences needs to be conducted. Therefore, a protectiveness determination for this site cannot be made until the noted additional information is obtained and evaluated. https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/149104.pdf ​ 29. FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill,) Orleans, NY The FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill) site is an inactive waste site in the towns of Ridgeway and Shelby in Orleans County, New York. The 30-acre site includes a 21-acre area that contains two inactive rock quarries and wooded property, and a 9-acre area to the south containing a waste pile, a rectangular pond and a swamp. From 1933 to 1968, about 6 acres of the south parcel were used to dispose of coal ash cinders, laboratory wastes consisting of glass bottles and chemical residues, residues from lime sulfur filtration, building debris and residues from pesticide production areas. The site’s long-term cleanup has been completed, protecting human health and the environment. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201207 ​ 30. Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision, Niagara, NY The Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. Prior to 1973, the 39-acre area was used for illegal chemical waste disposal, contaminating soil and groundwater with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Residential development of the site property took place in 1979. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202361 ​ 31. Fulton Avenue, Nassau, NY The Fulton Avenue site is located at 150 Fulton Avenue in Garden City Park in Nassau County, New York. A fabric-cutting mill operated at the 0.8-acre area from 1965 through 1974. The mill’s operations contaminated soil and water with hazardous chemicals. Soil cleanup has been completed. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203853 ​ 32. Fulton Terminals, Oswego, NY The 1.5-acre Fulton Terminals site is located in an urban area adjacent to the Oswego River in Fulton, New York. Millions of gallons of waste, oils, and sludge were stored in tanks at the site and groun water, soil, and sediments were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Work has been done to clean up visibly-contaminated soil and tar-like wastes, excavate storm drains, remove contaminated soil and treat groundwater. Physical cleanup activites at the site have been completed. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202125 ​ 33. GCL Tie & Treating Inc., Delaware, NY The GCL Tie and Treating (GCL) site is located in Sidney, New York. The 60-acre site includes two major areas – the GCL property and the non-GCL property. The 26-acre GCL property consists of an inactive sawmill and wood treating facility. The non-GCL portion of the site includes two light manufacturing companies located on a parcel of land next to the GCL property. Threats posed by contaminated soil, aboveground tanks and drums containing creosote wastes and sludges have been addressed. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Area residents receive drinking water from public supply wells, which are routinely tested to ensure compliance with federal and state standards. Fencing restricts access to the site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203408 ​ 34. GE Moreau, Saratoga, NY The GE Moreau site is located in Moreau, New York. A pit on the site was used by the General Electric Company (GE) for the disposal of industrial waste from 1958 to 1968. Soil, surface water and groundwater are contaminated with hazardous substances. Cleanup actions at the site were completed in 1990, and maintenance and monitoring are ongoing. While groundwater at the site continues to exceed federal cleanup levels for several chemicals of concern, there are currently no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks to the public. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201858 ​ 35. General Motors (Central Foundry Division,) St. Lawrence, NY The General Motors (Central Foundry Division) site is located in Massena, New York. The cleanup of the GM site is ongoing and is being addressed in stages: immediate actions, which included the installation of a cap on the Industrial Landfill at the site in the late 1980’s to prevent the surface flow of contaminants and reduce potential air exposure from contaminants, and long-term cleanup phases focusing on the cleanup of St. Lawrence and Raquette River system sediments; excavation and removal of contaminated on-site soils; removal of contaminated soil and sediment on St. Regis Mohawk Tribal properties (including Turtle Cove); and treatment of contaminated groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201644 36. Genzale Plating Co., Nassau, NY The Genzale Plating Company site is located in Franklin Square, New York. It includes a metal-plating facility, an attached two-story office building and an undeveloped backyard area that served as a parking lot and storage area. From 1915 through 2000, the facility electroplated small products such as automobile antennas, parts of ball point pens, and bottle openers. It discharged wastewater containing heavy metals as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four subsurface leaching pits at the rear of the site. Soil cleanup has been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201344 37. Goldisc Recordings, Inc., Suffolk, NY The Goldisc Recordings site is located in Holbrook, New York. The 34-acre area consists of two one-story buildings that occupy 6 acres, 3 acres of pavement surrounding the buildings and 25 acres of undeveloped land. Between 1968 and 1983, Audio Visual, Inc. manufactured audio visual and optical devices, and Goldisc Recordings, Inc. manufactured phonograph records. Wastes generated included large quantities of nickel-plating wastes and hydraulic oil, and lesser quantities of solvents. Plating wastes were stored in aboveground storage tanks. On several occasions, the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) found chemical wastes in storm drains, holding ponds and dry wells. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Source materials have been cleaned up. Additional groundwater monitoring is expected to continue. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202239 ​ 38. Gowanus Canal, Kings, NY The Gowanus Canal is a 100-foot wide, 1.8-mile long canal in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. The Canal is bounded by several communities, including Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens and Red Hook. The Canal empties into New York Harbor. The adjacent waterfront is primarily commercial and industrial, currently consisting of concrete plants, warehouses and parking lots. The Gowanus Canal was built in the mid-1800s and was used as a major industrial transportation route. Manufactured gas plants (MGP), paper mills, tanneries and chemical plants operated along the Canal and discharged wastes into it. In addition, contamination flows into the Canal from overflows from sewer systems that carry sanitary waste from homes and rainwater from storm drains and industrial pollutants. As a result, the Gowanus Canal has become one of the nation's most seriously contaminated water bodies. More than a dozen contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and heavy metals, including mercury, lead and copper, are found at high levels in the sediment in the Canal. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206222 39. Haviland Complex , Dutchess, NY The Haviland Complex site covers 275 acres in Hyde Park, New York. It includes an apartment complex, a junior high school, an elementary school, a shopping center and several homes. Failure of the septic and sewage systems of a car wash and laundromat contaminated area groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202284 ​ ​ ​ ​ 40. Hertel Landfill, Ulster, NY he Hertel Landfill site is located in Plattekill, New York. The 80-acre area is an inactive waste disposal area. It was established in 1963 as a municipal waste landfill. Until 1977, about 15 acres of the land were used for disposal, contaminating soil, groundwater and surface water with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup activities, long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202267 ​ 41. Hiteman Leather, Herkimer, NY The Hiteman Leather site was the location of a former tannery and leather manufacturing facility located in the Village of West Winfield, New York. Approximately 180,000 gallons of chromium-containing wastewater was discharged from the tannery into three unlined lagoons and nearby wetlands, which drain into the Unadilla River. Settled solids in the lagoons were periodically excavated and deposited as bank material around the lagoons. In 1996, EPA conducted an investigation at the site that found elevated levels of chromium in the soil and surface water. Several other contaminants were detected at low levels in soils, including metals, pesticides, semi-volatiles and volatiles. The investigation also found asbestos-covered pipes throughout the main former tannery building and determined that the wood-framed sections of the building were structurally unsound. Following a comprehensive study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate cleanup alternatives, EPA selected a cleanup remedy for the site in September 2006. It included excavation of contaminated soil hot spots from the former tannery property; excavation and dredging of contaminated wetland and river sediments next to the former tannery property; solidification (the addition of cement additives to change the physical and chemical characteristics to immobilize contaminants) and consolidation of the excavated/dredged soils and sediments on the former tannery property; placement of a soil cover; and intermittent groundwater extraction and treatment. The cleanup remedy also indicated that the need for remediation of river sediments downstream of the former tannery would be determined based on further testing. During the design of the cleanup remedy, EPA determined that soils did not require solidification prior to disposal, that downstream sediments did not need to be remediated, and that groundwater contamination was not related to disposal activities at the site. EPA updated the site’s cleanup remedy to reflect these findings in 2008. The site cleanup finished in September 2008. After addressing the contaminated soils and sediments, EPA removed the site from the National Priorities List in February 2012. EPA will continue to assess conditions at the site every five years to ensure that the cleanup continues to be protective of human health and the environment. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202360 ​ 42. Hooker (Hyde Park,) Niagara, NY The Hooker (Hyde Park) site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 15-acre area was used for the disposal of about 80,000 tons of waste, some of it hazardous material, from 1953 to 1975, resulting in sediment and groundwater contamination with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to nearby residents or the environment. Construction of the site’s remedy finished in September 2003. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201306 43. Occidental Petroleum, Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp, Hooker (S Area,) Niagara, NY The Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp. site is located in Hicksville, New York. The 14-acre area is the location of a chemical manufacturing facility that operated from 1945 to 2002. Industrial wastewater discharges, as well as leaks and chemical spills, contaminated site soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201477 44. Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp., Nassau, NY 45. New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY The New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination site (Site) is an area of widespread groundwater contamination in the Towns of North Hempstead, Hempstead and Oyster Bay in Nassau County, New York. Sampling found contaminants in four Town of Hempstead wells, six Hamlet of Hicksville wells and one Village of Westbury well. The primary contaminants observed in groundwater at the Site are tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily into the air and dissolve in water. VOCs are often used as ingredients in paints, solvents, aerosol sprays, cleaners, disinfectants, automotive products and dry cleaning fluids. It is believed that past industrial and commercial activities in the area may have contributed to the groundwater contamination at the site. Consistent with the Safe Drinking Water Act that protects public drinking water supplies throughout the nation, the public water suppliers in the area of the Site monitor water quality regularly and have previously installed treatment systems to remove VOCs from groundwater. From 1988 to 2010, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) identified a number of sources of the contamination and further investigated the contaminated groundwater pursuant to New York State authorities. In 2010, NYSDEC requested that EPA list the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). The Site was listed on the NPL in September 2011. EPA is addressing the Site in discrete phases or components known as operable units or OUs. After the Site’s NPL listing, site investigations to determine the nature and extent of contamination and to identify and evaluate remedial alternatives began https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203974 46. Hopewell Precision Area Contamination, Dutchess, NY The Hopewell Precision site is located in Hopewell Junction, New York. The 5.7-acre area was the location of a manufacturing facility that produced sheet metal parts and assemblies. Operations on site contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA is working to identify the potential for exposure to contaminants at the site and developing the site’s long-term remedy. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201588 ​ 47. Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill, Suffolk, NY The Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill site is located in Islip, New York. The 55-acre landfill is part of a 109-acre complex operated by the Islip Resource Recovery Agency. The Town of Islip operated the landfill from 1963 to 1990. Wastes disposed of at the landfill contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Operation and maintenance activities are ongoing, including the operation of a groundwater treatment system. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201714 48. Jackson Steel, Nassau, NY The Jackson Steel site is an inactive "roll form metal shapes" manufacturing facility in Mineola and North Hempstead, New York. Jackson Steel operated at the site from 1970 to 1991. The site is bordered to the north by commercial and single-family dwellings, to the east by a two-story apartment complex, to the south by a daycare center, and to the west by an office building and restaurant. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Currently, there are no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks. None is expected as long as the site use does not change and vapor mitigation systems continue to be properly operated, monitored and maintained. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204218 49. Johnstown City Landfill, Fulton, NY The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The industrial wastes generated by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. SludgeExternal Web Site Icon from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records indicating the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill. On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the United States Environmental Protection AgencyExternal Web Site Icon (US EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC). In June 1989, the NYS DOH completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). A conclusion in the preliminary health assessment was that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and that the most significant public health concern was the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells. Recommendations of the preliminary health assessment included the need to further characterize the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater and at the site. A remedial investigation (RI) was conducted at the site between June 1989 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments, air, and studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. The preferred remedy for the site was finalized in a March 1993 record of decision (ROD) and includes: Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit; Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound; Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to private homes; Erection of a security fence around the landfill mound; Institution of land-use restrictions; and Environmental monitoring which will include long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments. Past public health concerns included the potential for contaminants to migrate to the City of Johnstown public water supply Wells 1 and 2 on Maple Avenue southeast of the site as well as the possibility of contamination of private drinking water supplies downgradient of the landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have sampled residential wells near the site and participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. Exposure to organic contaminants in private water supplies occurred in the past. One residential water supply had contaminants above NYS DOH drinking water standards. This property was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980; the well was properly abandoned and the property remains vacant. Prior to 1980, when contamination was first detected, it is not known how long or if users of this water supply were exposed to organic contaminants. Past completed exposure pathways to site contaminants include exposure to on-site wastes and leachate. However, there are no contaminant data to evaluate the public health significance of these past exposures. Potential human exposure pathways to contaminants originating at the landfill include ingestion of fish; inhalation of VOCs and particulate chromium in ambient air, direct contact, ingestion and inhalation of VOCs in surface water sediment, leachate, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to contaminants in surface water, groundwater, leachate, on-site waste, sediment in LaGrange Gravel Pit and drinking water will be eliminated once the selected remedy for clean-up of the site is in place. Because of past, present and possible future human exposures to contaminants in drinking water and potential (past and present) exposures to contaminants in fish and surface water, the Johnstown City Landfill poses a public health hazard. ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) has evaluated this Public Health Assessment to determine appropriate follow-up health activities. The HARP determined that those persons exposed in the past should be considered for inclusion in the NYS DOH's registry being developed for VOC exposures from drinking contaminated water. The proposed measures for remediation of the Johnstown City Landfill as described in the ROD should be carried out to eliminate the potential for human exposure to contaminants at and near the landfill. Specifically, public water should be extended to the affected and potentially affected residences with private water supplies, since initial groundwater remediation does not include pumping and treating of the groundwater contaminant plume. BACKGROUND A. Site Description and History The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is 1.5 miles northwest of the City of Johnstown and 1.75 miles west of the City of Gloversville on West Fulton Street Extension in Fulton County, New York (refer to Figures 1 and 2, Appendix A). Prior to landfill operations, the site was used extensively for excavation of sand and gravel. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The landfill had been used for the disposal of wastes for 12 years by three septic tank and industrial waste haulers. The industrial wastes were generated primarily by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. Sludge from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records available which indicate the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill. Most of the tannery wastes were disposed as chromium-treated hide trimmings and other materials. Sewage sludge was disposed in open piles on-site for six years between 1973 and 1979 and reportedly contained chromium, iron and lead. Sewage sludge was disposed at a rate of about 20,000 cubic yards per year (yds3/yr). A former disposal pit on the westward side of the landfill was used for demolition debris and metals wastes. Reportedly, an unknown number of drums containing chemicals were also disposed at the site. The landfill consists of two flat terraces and a former disposal pit at the base of a steep ridge on the westward side of the landfill. Currently, the landfill has an interim (native soil) cover and there are several leachate outbreaks at the foot of the landfill on-site and at an off-site downgradient spring (LaGrange Spring). The site has two fences with locked gates at the main site entrance, which prevent vehicular access. These fences were installed before the landfill was closed in 1989, to prevent unauthorized dumping. The rest of the site perimeter is heavily wooded or borders active farmlands. Past investigations completed at and near the Johnstown City Landfill include: A sanitary landfill study of the City of Johnstown Landfill which was completed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) in April 1978; A study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek, which was conducted by the NYS DEC in November 1978; A methane gas migration study completed by the NYS DEC in September 1981; A preliminary investigation of the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Ecological Analysts, Inc., in November 1983; An evaluation of the status of groundwater contamination near the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Paul A. Rubin in September 1984; and A study of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis in relation to Mathew Creek which was completed by the NYS DEC in July 1987. The sanitary landfill study evaluated if past disposal activities at the landfill had resulted in groundwater contamination in the area and if this contamination was affecting water quality in the City of Johnstown's public water supply wells, southeast of the site. The study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek investigated the effects of leachate discharge from the landfill on fish and other organisms; findings of this study indicated that water quality in the upper reaches of the creek were toxic to fish, however, it was not concluded if fish mortality was due to naturally occurring poor water quality conditions or site contaminants. The methane migration study evaluated the potential for explosive levels of methane to migrate off-site; findings of this study indicated that elevated levels of methane were detected on private property northeast of the landfill. The preliminary investigation and study of groundwater contamination included installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells at the landfill; additionally, surface water sampling was conducted at selected locations along Mathew Creek. The investigation of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis evaluated water quality in Mathew Creek. On May 5, 1983, representatives of Ecological Analysts, Inc., a consultant for the NYS DEC, conducted a site inspection of the Johnstown City Landfill. During this site inspection, the location and condition of existing on-site monitoring wells was noted. An extensive sand and gravel mining operation was observed northwest of the active portion of the landfill and groundwater seeps were observed along the southwest face of the excavation. Several empty 55-gallon drums and 10,000 gallon tanks were observed near the base of the south landfill slope; in addition, a leachate seep was also observed in this area. In the sand and gravel pit on the south side of the landfill, open water had collected and a large quantity of sludge-like material was floating on the surface of this standing water. Household wastes were scattered along the eastern side of the landfill face. On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), also known as Superfund, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the NYS DEC. In 1988, the City of Johnstown, entered into a Consent Order with the NYS DEC to conduct a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) at the site. Landfill operations ceased in June 1989. In June 1989, the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In the preliminary health assessment, inhalation of contaminated dust and particulates as well as dermal contact with contaminated surface water, groundwater and soils were identified as the potential human exposure routes of concern for on-site workers. Potential human exposure routes of concern identified for off-site receptors included ingestion of contaminated groundwater and dermal contact with contaminated surface water and soils. In the preliminary health assessment, it was concluded that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and determined that the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells was the most significant public health concern. Further characterization of the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater at the site was recommended. The RI was conducted in multiple phases between June 1989 and March 1992. The first phase of the RI was conducted between June 1989 and June 1990; the second phase of the RI was completed between July 1990 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments and air as well as studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. Ecological studies in Halls Brook and Mathew Creek were also conducted as part of the RI, as well as delineation of wetlands near Mathew Creek. Findings of the RI indicated that 34 acres of the 68-acre site consist of mixed municipal wastes buried at depths ranging from 29.5 feet to 32 feet below surface. Scrap animal hides were found in several of the test pits confirming past disposal of tannery wastes at the landfill. As part of the FS for the site, several clean-up alternatives were evaluated. The preferred remedy for the site includes: Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit and placing excavated materials on the existing landfill (the gravel pit will be backfilled with clean fill); Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound to isolate wastes from rainfall and human contact; Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to homes near the landfill to replace existing water supplies which may be affected by landfill contaminants migrating off-site in groundwater; Installation of a security fence around the landfill mound; Institution of land-use restrictions; and Environmental monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the remedial measures, including long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments. The provisions for capping include measures to control and monitor methane migration. The preferred remedy also includes provisions to reevaluate groundwater remediation in the event that monitoring results indicate that groundwater and surface water quality are not being restored to acceptable levels through natural attenuation as a result of reduced leachate generation. If groundwater remediation does occur in the future, it would include the extraction of groundwater using wells and submersible pumps with on-site treatment to remove metals and volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), with discharge of the treated water to the aquifer or to a stream. A record of decision (ROD) supporting implementation of this preferred remedy was finalized by US EPA in March 1993. Currently, design of the selected remedy is underway. B. Actions Completed During the Public Health Assessment Process In May of 1977, the NYS DOH expressed concern about landfilling practices at the Johnstown City Landfill and the possible effects of groundwater contamination associated with continued use of the Maple Avenue water supply wells, southeast of the site. NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that water samples from the City water supply wells on Maple Avenue be collected every six months and analyzed for chromium to ensure that users of the water supply were not exposed to unacceptable levels. In 1977, the NYS DOH also recommended to the City Council that consumers who received drinking water from the Maple Avenue wells for prolonged periods of time be advised of the high sodium content. Because of concerns with continued degradation of the water quality in two City water supply wells on Maple Avenue, the NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that the City's long range water supply planning should consider alternate water sources. The City of Johnstown was advised to limit use of the Maple Avenue wells, except during emergencies. The City was also advised to continue to purchase water from the City of Gloversville to supplement their water supply and to initiate development of a new water source. The City of Johnstown public water supply wells on Maple Avenue (wells 1 and 2), south of the landfill, were not used after October 1980 and the wells were permanently taken out of service (i.e., the pumps were removed) in the mid-1980's. Representatives of NYS DOH as well as consultants working for the potentially responsible parties (PRP's) have conducted sampling of residential and other private water supplies near the Johnstown City Landfill as part of past investigatory activities at the site. NYS DOH has provided property owners and residents with copies of the analytical results as well as an explanation of the findings of their water sample results. During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. On May 17, 1989, a public meeting was held to present the draft workplan for investigation of the landfill and proposed sampling of 18 residential wells near the site. In June 1990, a public meeting was held to present findings of the first phase of the RI and present plans for the second phase of the RI. The most recent public meeting was held on February 10, 1993, to present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. The landfill was closed in June 1989 and vehicular access to the site has been restricted by a locked gate across the access road at the main entrance. Community outreach and community education has been conducted in the past by NYS DEC, NYS DOH and US EPA. Informational materials have been provided to the public about ongoing and proposed activities at the site throughout the RI/FS process. Information repositories have been established at numerous locations including the NYS DEC and US EPA regional offices, the Johnstown Public Library and the Johnstown City Attorney's office. These repositories contain technical, factual and other information related to the site and are available for public reference. The only residential well which showed contamination above NYS DOH drinking water standards was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980. The water supply well at this property was properly abandoned and the house remains vacant. C. Site Visit On October 22, 1986, Mr. Gary Litwin of the NYS DOH met with representatives of the City of Johnstown, NYS DEC and a citizens action group known as Rainbow Alliance for a Cleaner Environment (RACE). The purpose of the site visit was to observe and evaluate the effect of chromium sludge deposits which had eroded from the landfill on to an adjacent residential property. Following this site visit, NYS DEC expressed concern about the quality of water that had ponded in the gravel pit; Mr. Litwin of the NYS DOH, expressed concern that leachate seeps from the landfill had eroded a gully, exposing municipal refuse and sludge. Furthermore, the leachate seeps were flowing off-site to a small pond through an area which, at the time, was frequently used by off-road vehicles. Mr. Litwin also reported that direct contact with this leachate was occurring and that past sampling of the leachate by NYS DEC showed high levels of chromium, lead and cadmium. Based on the findings of this site investigation, NYS DOH recommended to the NYS DEC that measures be taken to prevent further off-site migration of leachate and prevent direct contact with exposed wastes and contaminated soil. Additionally, NYS DOH recommended that sampling of surface water and sediment be conducted in the pond. Over the past several years, numerous site visits to the Johnstown City Landfill have been conducted by NYS DOH staff, including Richard Fedigan, Gary Litwin and Claudine Jones Rafferty. Representatives of various other agencies, including US EPA, NYS DEC and the NYS DOH Amsterdam District Office were also present during many of these site visits. The purpose of these visits included sampling of groundwater and investigating site conditions. Past site visits have shown little evidence of trespassers. The most recent site visit was conducted by Claudine Jones Rafferty of the NYS DOH on February 10, 1993. The purpose of this site visit was to evaluate current demographics and the environmental setting surrounding the site. Access onto the landfill proper was not made during this site visit, due to adverse weather conditions and deep snow. Site conditions are not known to have changed since this site visit was conducted. D. Demographics, Land Use, and Natural Resource Use Demographics The Johnstown City Landfill is about two miles northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. In general, the area surrounding the landfill is sparsely populated. However, there are about 80 private residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension, Johnstown Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension. NYS DOH estimated, from the 1990 Census, that 525 people live within 1 mile of the Johnstown City Landfill. The ethnic distribution of the population within 1 mile of the site is 100 percent white. The site is within census tract 9906.00; in this census tract, 5.3 percent of the population is under 5 years of age, 22.6 percent is 5-19 years of age, 56.5 percent is 20-64 years of age and 15.6 percent is 65 years or older. The median household income in 1989 for this census tract was $27,189, with 5 percent of the families with income below the poverty level. Land Use Land use in the area surrounding the landfill is mixed and includes residential, agricultural and recreational development. The area immediately north of the site is part of a State reforestation area and residential density in this area is low. Open fields exist to the south and west and mixed woodlands exist between the landfill and the agricultural areas to the south and also along the eastern site boundary. The two nearest residential properties border the northern site boundary. There are several sand and gravel operations in the Johnstown area including the LaGrange Gravel Pit, just east of the site, and the former sand and gravel operation on-site. Natural Resource Use Surface Water The Johnstown City Landfill is situated south of a major drainage divide that bisects Fulton County. In general, surface water drainage is to the southeast near the site. Mathew Creek is the primary surface water feature near the site (refer to Figure 2, Appendix A) and is classified by the NYS DEC as a "Class A" surface water body, which is designated as a source of water supply for drinking, cooking, recreation and fishing. The headwaters of Mathew Creek, known as LaGrange Springs, are about 1,100 feet southeast of the site. The presence of LaGrange Springs and Mathew Creek is attributed to the intersection of the groundwater table with the ground surface (TWM Northeast, 1992). Mathew Creek flows through Hulbert's Pond and converges with Halls Brook to the southeast before discharging to Cayadutta Creek, which ultimately drains to the Mohawk River. A privately owned, manmade pond, known as Hulberts Pond, has been developed along Mathew Creek, just east of the intersection of Hulbert Road and O'Neil Avenue Extension. Hulberts Pond was stocked with fish in the past, however, a fishkill in this pond was reported in June 1984 and it is not known if Hulberts Pond is currently used for fishing or other recreational activities. LaGrange Gravel Pit, which issituated east of the landfill boundary, is not classified by the NYS DEC as a surface water body. Groundwater Local groundwater near the site occurs as a result of precipitation that percolates through surficial soils and unconsolidated deposits to the underlying bedrock (TWM Northeast, 1992). In general, groundwater in the overburden deposits flows from areas north and northwest of the landfill towards LaGrange Springs and Matthew Creek, south of the site. Groundwater flow in the bedrock aquifer is from west to east near the site. Groundwater flow directions do not appear to be affected by seasonal fluctuations in groundwater levels. Groundwater near the site is used as a drinking water supply at private residences as well as for agricultural purposes at nearby farms, including a dairy farm operation. There are about 80 residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension; the nearest homes border the site perimeter to the north, along West Fulton Street Extension. The homes along O'Neil Avenue Extension are about one mile south of the site and the homes along Johnstown Avenue Extension are about one half mile to one mile east and southeast of the site. Most of these homes rely on groundwater for drinking and other household uses. Prior to 1980, the City of Johnstown also used groundwater in the area near the landfill as a source for the public water supply. Two former City water supply wells (wells 1 and 2, also known as the Maple Avenue wells) are about 5,000 feet southeast of the landfill (refer to Figures 5 and 11, Appendix A). These wells were installed in 1965 to supplement the existing main source of water (Cork Center Reservoir) for the City's public water supply. Groundwater from the Maple Avenue Wells was pumped to the Maylender Reservoir for storage prior to distribution. The only treatment that this water received was disinfection (i.e., chlorination). These two wells were intended to provide about 1 million gallons per day (mgd) of water and served about 10,000 people. However, due to natural water quality degradation in the Maple Avenue Wellfield between 1965 and 1977, use of these wells gradually declined during the mid to late 1970's. Average water use of the City water supply was about 2.85 mgd. These wells have not been used since 1980 and were permanently taken out of service in the mid-1980's. E. Health Outcome Data The NYS DOH maintains several health outcome data bases which could be used to generate site-specific data, if warranted. These data bases include the cancer registry, the congenital malformations registry, the heavy metals registry, the occupational lung disease registry, vital records (birth and death certificates) and hospital discharge information. COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS In August and September of 1977, the NYS DOH received numerous complaints about the taste and odor of drinking water as well as possible illness by users of the public water supply served by the Maple Avenue wells. In November 1977, a private well serving a residence about 1 mile southeast of the Johnstown City Landfill was sampled by the NYS DOH. With the exception of lead, which was reported at 0.1 milligrams per liter (mg/L), all parameters were within normal ranges. The reported lead concentration exceeded the existing NYS DOH maximum contaminant level (MCL) in effect at that time (0.05 mg/L) for public water supplies. The residents using this water supply as well as members of the community expressed concern about the possible health effects from exposure to elevated lead in drinking water. In 1978, a nearby resident reported to the NYS DEC that fish were not surviving in Hulbert's Pond. This resident attributed the poor fish survival to landfill leachate discharging into surface waters upstream of Hulbert's Pond. In March 1979, a resident living north of the Johnstown City Landfill reported to the NYS DOH that a significant change in his drinking water supply had occurred and expressed concern about the proximity of the landfill to affect his water supply. In June 1990, the NYS DEC held a public meeting to present findings of the interim RI/FS report. Following this meeting, one of the citizens provided written comments to the NYS DEC expressing concern about a number of issues related to the potential for chemicals to migrate from the Johnstown City Landfill and contamination of their drinking water. In the fall of 1991, a representative of the Rainbow Alliance for Clean Environment (RACE), expressed concern about the analytical results of a water sample that was collected from a private residence near the Johnstown City Landfill. Specifically, these concerns pertained to ammonia, a compound that was detected in the residents water sample, and the possible health effects from exposure to ammonia in drinking water. During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, NYS DEC and US EPA have participated in numerous public meetings regarding investigation and sampling activities, community and public health concerns and remediation activities at the Johnstown City Landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). Additionally, the community has expressed concern about contamination of surficial waters downgradient of the landfill. On February 10, 1993, US EPA representatives held a public meeting at the Johnstown High School to present the findings of the RI/FS and discuss the proposed measures to remediate the Johnstown City Landfill. Claudine Jones Rafferty and Richard Fedigan of the NYS DOH and representatives of the NYS DEC also attended the meeting. About 50 citizens attended this meeting. The primary community concerns presented at this meeting were associated with initial and long-term costs associated with construction, maintenance and use of the proposed public water distribution system to residents living near the landfill. Concerns about the extent contaminant migration from the landfill and the need for preventative measures to control future contaminant migration were also expressed. No specific health concerns were identified. During public review of the draft public health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill, one citizen expressed concern that the incidence of cancer in the area was high, given the relatively small population. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/pha.asp?docid=221&pg=1 50. Jones Chemicals, Inc., Livingston, NY The Jones Chemicals, Inc. site is located in Caledonia, New York. A chemical manufacturing plant at the 4210-acre area repackaged chlorine from bulk containers into smaller containers for resale from 1942 to 1960. From 1960 to 1977, Jones Chemicals repackaged chlorinated solvents and petroleum products, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The company stopped repackaging solvents in 1985. The plant now produces sodium hypochlorite (bleach) solutions and sodium bisulfite. It also repackages chlorine, sulfur dioxide, inorganic mineral acids, sodium hypochlorite, ammonium hydroxide, caustic soda and various inorganic water-treatment chemicals. Spills occurred during the transfer and repackaging of many of these chemicals, contaminating soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term soil and groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201302 51. Kentucky Avenue Well Field, Chemung, NY The Kentucky Avenue Wellfield (KAW) is part of the EWB public-water supply system. It was constructed in 1962 and provided approximately 10 percent of the potable water produced by the Elmira water Board (EWB) until its closure in 1980 following the discovery of elevated levels of trichloroethylene (TCE). TCE contamination was first detected in the KAW in May 1980 during an inventory of local wells initiated by the New York Department of Health (NYSDOH). In July 1980, the Chemung County Health Department conducted further groundwater sampling in the area and similarly found elevated levels of TCE in the KAW and several private residences and commercial facilities. As a result of these findings, the EWB closed the KAW in September 1980 and removed it from its other sources of potable water for its users. In 1983, the Site was placed on the federal National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites. Additional sampling conducted by local, state, and federal agencies through 1985 identified TCE contamination throughout the Newtown Creek Aquifer. In March 1985, EPA initiated a removal action for the purpose of providing alternate water supplies to impacted residences not connected to the public water distribution system. Residences whose private wells were found to be contaminated with TCE in excess of the NYSDOH drinking water standards for public water supplies were supplied with bottled water and ultimately connected to the public water supply. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202142 ​ 52. Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc., Suffolk, NY The Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc. (LAI) site is located in Port Jefferson Station, New York. The 126-acre area includes LAI's manufacturing plant, which historically produced titanium sheeting for the aeronautics industry. The LAI facility consists of 10 buildings in the southwestern portion of the property. An abandoned, unlined earthen lagoon that formerly received liquid wastes is west of the buildings. A former drum crushing area is south of the buildings. About 80 acres northeast and east of the LAI facility are referred to as the "Outlying Parcels." They are vacant, wooded areas. Finally, the site also includes a downgradient contaminated groundwater plume. Currently, the LAI facility is not operating, many buildings are vacant, and unused. Past disposal practices resulted in a variety of contaminant releases, including trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), acid wastes, oils, sludge, metals and other plant wastes. Following short-term cleanups to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is now in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201335 ​ 53. Lehigh Valley Railroad, Genesee, NY The Lehigh Valley Railroad site is located in LeRoy, New York. The area is the location of a chemical spill that resulted from a train derailment in 1970. About 1 ton of cyanide crystals and around 30,000 to 35,000 gallons of trichloroethene (TCE) spilled onto the ground, contaminating soil and groundwater. The site includes portions of Gulf Road, the former railroad bed and the properties next to the railroad crossing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203481 54. Li Tungsten Corp., Nassau, NY The LI Tungsten Superfund Site is located in the City of Glen Cove, Nassau County, New York. The Site consists of the former Li Tungsten facility property located at 63 Herbhill Road, certain portions of the nearby Captain’s Cove property that were contaminated with radioactive material, and other areas where radiologically contaminated materials associated with the former Li Tungsten facility came to be located, including portions of Glen Cove Creek. The former Li Tungsten facility is 26 acres and consists of three separate parcels. The 23-acre Captain’s Cove property is bounded by Hempstead Harbor to the west, Garvies Point Preserve to the north, the Glen Cove Anglers’ Club to the east, and Glen Cove Creek to the south. A four-acre wetland makes up a portion of the Captain’s Cove property’s southern boundary with the Creek. The Wah Chang Smelting and Refining Company owned the former Li Tungsten facility from the 1940s to about 1984 and, during that period, a succession of entities, including Teledyne Inc. and the Li Tungsten Corp., operated the facility. Operations generally involved the processing of ore and scrap tungsten concentrates to metal tungsten powder and tungsten carbide powder, although other specialty metal products were also produced. Portions of the Captain’s Cove property were used as a dumpsite for a variety of wastes, including the disposal of spent ore residuals by the operators of the former Li Tungsten facility. The Glen Cove Development Corporation (GCDC) acquired the Li Tungsten facility property in 1984 and leased it to the Li Tungsten Corporation, which declared bankruptcy in 1985 and ceased operations. Glen Cove Creek is a 1.0 mile federal navigation channel that is maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers. It extends from Hempstead Harbor easterly to the head of navigation at Charles Street near the municipal center of Glen Cove. During routine maintenance dredging in 2001, the Corps discovered the presence of radioactive materials in Glen Cove Creek, which led to the indefinite suspension of the dredging program and the inclusion of the creek as part of the Li Tungsten Superfund Site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202972 ​ 55. Liberty Industrial Finishing, Nassau, NY he Liberty Industrial Finishing site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During World War II and the Korean War, industrial operations at the 30-acre site included aircraft parts manufacturing and associated metal finishing processes largely in support of military efforts. After the wars, the site was used for other industrial and warehousing operations. During these operations, wastes were discharged into below-grade sumps, underground leaching chambers and unlined groundwater recharge basins or lagoons. These operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and vapor monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201184 ​ 56. Little Valley, Cattaraugus, NY The Little Valley Superfund site is comprised of a plume of trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater that extends approximately eight miles southeastward from the Village of Little Valley to the northern edge of the City of Salamanca, which is part of the Allegheny Indian Reservation, in Cattauragus County, New York. The site is located in a rural, agricultural area with a number of small, active and inactive industries and more than 200 residential properties situated along Route 353, the main transportation route between Little Valley and the City of the Salamanca. In 1982, the Cattaraugus County Health Department (CCHD) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), while investigating TCE contamination in the vicinity of a small manufacturing facility on Route 353, detected TCE in nearby private wells. NYSDEC installed a number of monitoring wells in the area to investigate possible sources of the contamination, including a former drum storage area, a private disposal site next to the former drum storage area, an inactive municipal landfill which accepted industrial wastes, and industrial facilities. Following the installation of treatment systems on private wells, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place, which consisted of a soil remediation, a long-term groundwater monitoring program, and an evaluation of the potential for soil vapor intrusion into structures within the study area and mitigation, if necessary. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204016 ​ 57. Ludlow Sand & Gravel, Oneida, NY (REMOVED) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting its fourth five-year review of the Ludlow Sand and Gravel Superfund Site, located in the town of Paris, Oneida County, New York. This review seeks to confirm that the cleanup conducted at the site, which included removal of contaminated soil and sediments, placement of a cap over the landfill at the site, solidification of deeper contaminated soil and ground water monitoring, continues to protect human health and the environment. Although the Ludlow Sand and Gravel site was deleted from the National Priorities List in December 2013, five-year reviews will continue as needed. A summary of cleanup activities and an evaluation of the protectiveness of the implemented remedy will be included in the five-year review report. http://town.paris.ny.us/content/News/View/31:field=documents;/content/Documents/File/72.pdf 58. MacKenzie Chemical Works, Inc. Suffolk, NY The MacKenzie Chemical Works site is located in Central Islip, New York. The site property was used from 1948 to 1987 for the manufacture of various chemical products, including fuel additives and metal acetylacetonates. According to the Suffolk County Department of Health Services, MacKenzie stored 1, 2, 3-trichloropropane in three 10,000-gallon tanks on site. Other historical waste sources include other storage tanks, leaking drums, waste lagoons, cesspools and stormwater drywells. Spills, explosions and fires have occurred at the facility, including a methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) spill in 1977, a nitrous oxide release in 1978 and an MEK spill/fire in 1979. The site’s long-term remedy is in place. Soil and groundwater treatment are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202187 59. Malta Rocket Fuel Area, Saratoga, NY The Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is located in the towns of Malta and Stillwater, in Saratoga County, New York. The site consists of the 165-acre former Malta Test Station and undeveloped forest that forms part of the safety easement for the Test Station. The U.S. government established the Test Station in 1945 for rocket engine and fuel testing. Research and development activities at the Test Station continued until 1984. Operations at the site involved the use of hazardous substances, which resulted in surface water and groundwater becoming contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride (carbon tet), and contaminating the site soil with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The cleanup at the site has been completed and included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and debris and treatment of the water supply. The long-term cleanup remedy also includes ongoing surface water monitoring and periodic monitoring of groundwater. Active redevelopment of the site is underway. In 2009, the Saratoga Economic Development Corporation began the first phase of the construction of the Luther Forest Technology Campus. GLOBALFOUNDRIES U.S., Inc., the first tenant at the Luther Forest Technology Campus, has already redeveloped a portion of the site. Eventually, the entire Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is expected to be encompassed by the technology campus. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=020208 ​ 60. Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc., Nassau, NY The Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc. site is located in Glen Cove, New York. The 2.5-acre area is an inactive chemical distribution facility. From the mid-1960s until 1987, Mattiace received chemicals by tank truck and redistributed them to its customers. The company also operated the M&M Drum Cleaning Company on site until 1982. During this time, a Quonset hut, shed, concrete loading dock and about 56 storage tanks were located on site. In 1988, EPA undertook an emergency action to secure the site and remove more than 100,000 gallons of hazardous liquids. Construction of the site’s long-term soil and groundwater remedy as described in the 1991 Record of Decision (ROD) finished in 1998. The treatment system operated for approximately 16 years before a ROD Amendment was signed in September 2014 changing the remedy. The amended remedy is currently in the design phase with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin in summer 2016. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201219 61. Mercury Refining, Inc., Albany, NY The Mercury Refining, Inc. site is located on the border of the towns of Guilderland and Colonie, New York. From 1955 to 1998, Mercury Refining Company, Inc. (MERECO) used the half-acre area for reclaiming mercury from batteries and other mercury-bearing materials. Facility operations contaminated soils, groundwater and sediments in a tributary of Patroon Creek with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury. Cleanup at the site was completed in 2014. Long-term groundwater and ecological monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201552 ​ 62. Mohonk Road Industrial Plant, Ulster, NY The Mohonk Road Industrial Plant site is located in High Falls, New York. From the early 1960s through the 1970s, industrial operations at the 14.5-acre area included metal finishing, wet spray painting and fixture manufacturing. All of these operations required the use of solvents. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA developed the site’s long-term remedy. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203945 63. Nepera Chemical Co., Inc., Orange, NY The Nepera Chemical Company site is located in Hamptonburgh, New York. The site is a 29-acre former industrial waste disposal facility. Between 1953 and 1967, lagoons at the site received about 50,000 gallons of wastewater per day from the Nepera chemical plant in Harriman, New York. Nepera made a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial chemicals. State inspectors detected leaks from the lagoons in 1958 and 1960, and operations ended in December 1967. The company’s operations contaminated soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. 29https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201188 ​ 64. Niagara Mohawk Power Co. (Saratoga Springs,) Saratoga, NY The Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. (NMPC) (Saratoga Springs Plant) site is located in Saratoga Springs, New York. The site includes a 7-acre parcel (the NMPC Property), the former skating rink property (a 2.3-acre property formerly owned by the City of Saratoga Springs), and portions of Spring Run Creek. The Saratoga Gas Light Company, a predecessor company of Niagara Mohawk, used the NMPC property for coal gas manufacturing. Various other companies then used the property from 1853 until the late 1940s. Byproduct materials containing hazardous substances were disposed of at various locations at the NMPC property. The property's subsurface contains coal tar waste deposits from these operations. Niagara Mohawk operated the site from 1950 to 1999 as a district service center and headquarters for its electric line, natural gas, vehicle and equipment repair, maintenance, storage facilities, and tree trimming crews servicing the Saratoga District. The site’s long-term cleanup and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202182 65. Old Bethpage Landfill, Nassau, NY he Old Bethpage Landfill site is located in Old Bethpage, New York. The Town of Oyster Bay operated the 65-acre landfill from 1957 to 1986. In addition to municipal wastes and garbage, industrial wastes from local industries were also disposed in the landfill in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Landfill operations contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring at the site are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201951 66. Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Nassau, NY The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area site is located in Garden City, New York. Two Garden City public drinking water supply wells at the site have been found to be contaminated with the chlorinated solvents tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The site includes the former Roosevelt Field airfield. Chlorinated solvents such as TCE and PCE have been widely used for aircraft manufacturing, maintenance and repair operations since the 1930s. The site is now the location of a shopping mall, office buildings, parking areas and Hazelhurst Park. Nassau County conducts regular well sampling and analysis of the public supply wells, and EPA is addressing site cleanup through federal actions. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204234 ​ 67. Olean Well Field, Cattaraugus, NY The Olean Well Field is located in Olean, New York. The 1.5-square-mile area includes three public and 50 private wells contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE). Much of the groundwater contamination is believed to be the result of industrial operations at several nearby commercial establishments. Contamination was discovered in 1981. Use of the public wells was discontinued after detection of the TCE and an old surface water filtration plant was reactivated to provide water to city residents. In 1990, the public wells were reactivated after two air strippers were installed to treat the groundwater. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and long-term cleanup efforts are ongoing. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201877 ​ 68. Pasley Solvents & Chemicals, Inc., Nassau, NY The Pasley Solvents and Chemicals site is located in the Town of Hempstead, Nassau County New York. The 75-foot-by-275-foot area is a former tank farm used for the storage of oils, solvents and chemicals. Poor waste handling and storage practices resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater on and off the site property with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2011. A police station is currently located on site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202422 69. Peninsula Boulevard Ground Water Plume, Nassau, NY The Peninsula Boulevard Groundwater Plume site is a tetrachloroethylene (PCE or perc) groundwater plume in Hewlett, New York. Its source is unknown. The groundwater flows toward the northwest, in the direction of the Long Island American Water Plant 5 Well Field, a source of drinking water. Since April 1991, the Plant 5 well water has been treated by a packed tower aeration system, also known as an air stripper. Remedial design for the site’s groundwater treatment system is underway. EPA is also assessing the site’s source areas. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204407 ​ 70. Peter Cooper Landfill, Cattaraugus, NY The Peter Cooper site is located in Gowanda, New York. The site was the location of an animal glue and industrial adhesive manufacturing factory. The site’s remedy includes an immediate response to address the source area (the landfill) and long-term cleanup focused on containment of the source and addressing exposure pathways outside the source area. A retaining wall prevents contaminants from reaching Cattaraugus Creek. Past disposal practices, including piling the sludge waste remaining after the animal glue manufacturing process on the northwest portion of the site led to the contamination of the soil. These wastes, known as “cookhouse sludge” because of a cooking cycle that occurred just prior to extraction of the glue, are derived primarily from chrome-tanned hides obtained from tanneries. The waste material has been shown to contain elevated levels of chromium, arsenic, zinc, and several organic compounds. After initial actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and cleanup were completed. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201887 ​ 71. Peter Cooper Corporation (Markhams,) Cattaraugus, NY The Peter Cooper Corporation site is located in Dayton, New York. The 106-acre site was an industrial waste disposal area for the Peter Cooper Corporation (PCC), a former animal glue and adhesives plant in Gowanda, New York. The wastes contaminated soil, leachate and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Contaminants found on site included sludges that contained arsenic, metals and organic compounds. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202124 72. Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Clinton, NY The 3,440-acre former Plattsburgh Air Force Base is located in Plattsburgh, New York. The site is located in a mixed use area consisting of industrial and commercial enterprises, as well as private residences. It is bordered on the north by the Saranac River and the city of Plattsburgh, and on the south by the Salmon River. Lake Champlain, located east of the base, forms approximately one mile of the base boundary. The base began operations in 1955 as a Tactical Wing under the Strategic Air Command of the United States Air Force. It continued operations under that mission until 1991, when it was reassigned as an Air Refueling Wing. The base closed under the Department of Defense (DoD) Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program in 1995. Prior to construction of the Air Force Base, the area occupied by the former base was used by various components of the U.S. military dating back to the Civil War. A history of the site is available on the Plattsburgh Airbase Redevelopment Corporation’s (PARC’s) website at http://www.parc-usa.com . Former Air Force base operations, including aircraft operation, testing and maintenance, firefighting exercises, the discharge of munitions, and landfill operations, generated hazardous wastes that contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater. Cleanup has been ongoing since the 1980’s and is nearly complete. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202439 73. Pollution Abatement Services, Oswego, NY The Pollution Abatement Services (PAS) site is located in Oswego, New York. The PAS facility, a high-temperature, liquid chemical waste, incineration facility, operated on the 15.5-acre property from 1970 to 1977. The facility experienced operational problems and was cited for numerous air and water quality violations by state and federal agencies. Because the incinerator never operated properly, more than 10,000 leaking and deteriorating accumulated on-site, more than a million gallons of oil and mixed hydrocarbons accumulated in three lagoons and contaminated waste oil accumulated in several aboveground and underground storage tanks. As a result, the site soil and groundwater were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the sediments in the adjacent White and Wine Creeks, which flow into Lake Ontario, were contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The facility was closed in 1977 and the site has been remediated https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201196 74. Port Washington Landfill Nassau, NY The Port Washington Landfill site is located in North Hempstead, New York. The 54-acre area is part of a municipal landfill. The area was a disposal area for construction debris. In 1973, the Town of North Hempstead purchased it and operated a municipal landfill until closing the facility in 1983. Operation of the landfill resulted in an off-site soil gas plume composed of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202155 ​ 75. Preferred Plating Corp., Suffolk NY Conditions at proposal (October 15, 1984): Preferred Plating Corp. conducted plating operations on a 0.5-acre site in Farmingdale, Town of Babylon, Suffolk County, New York, for more than 20 years, before going out of business in 1976. Since then, several firms have occupied the site. None conducted similar operations to Preferred Plating. An automobile repair shop now occupies the site. From 1955 to 1976, the Suffolk County Department of Health made numerous tests of waste materials contained in open pits. The pits were severely cracked and leaking, allowing discharges into ground water. In 1975, the county identified four major contaminants--copper, chromium, cadmium, and hexavalent chromium. About 15,000 people draw drinking water from wells within 3 miles of the site. The county has taken various court actions through the years to upgrade on-site treatment facilities. The court mandates were never accomplished. In 1976, Preferred Plating filed for bankruptcy. Status (June 10, 1986): EPA is considering various alternatives for this site. For more information about the hazardous substances identified in this narrative summary, including general information regarding the effects of exposure to these substances on human health, please see the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) ToxFAQs. ATSDR ToxFAQs can be found on the Internet at ATSDR - ToxFAQs (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/index.asp) or by telephone at 1-888-42-ATSDR or 1-888-422-8737. https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/363587.pdf ​ 76. Ramapo Landfill Rockland, NY The Ramapo Landfill site is located in Ramapo, New York. The 96-acre landfill opened in 1972. In 1978, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) denied the landfill operators an operating permit because of an incomplete permit application and violations of state codes. In addition, unauthorized dumping may have occurred at the landfill. Landfill operations contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201191 ​ 77. Richardson Hill Road Landfill/Pond, Delaware, NY The Richardson Hill Road Landfill site is located in Sidney and Masonville, New York. The landfill accepted municipal waste and spent oils from the Scintilla Division of Bendix Corporation (predecessor to Honeywell International, Inc. and Amphenol Corp.) from 1964 to 1969. Landfill operations contaminated soils, sediment, and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site consists of two sections–the South Area and the North Area. The South Area contains an 8-acre landfill, South Pond and Herrick Hollow Creek. The North Area includes two small disposal trenches and a manmade surface water body called North Pond. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the long-term groundwater collection and treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201770 78. Robintech, Inc./National Pipe Co., Broome, NY ​ The Robintech Inc./National Pipe Co. site is located in Vestal, New York. The 12-acre site is an active manufacturing facility. The site property was owned by Robinson Technical Products from 1966 to 1970, Robintech, Inc. from 1970 to 1982, and the Buffton Corporation from 1982 to 2006 (Buffton Corporation changed its name to BFX Hospitality, Inc. in 1996). The site is currently occupied by National Pipe and Plastics, which manufactures polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe from inert PVC resin on site. Facility operations contaminated soils and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201452 ​ 79. Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump, Cortland, NY The Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard Dump is an abandoned scrap-metal processing facility which occupies approximately 20 acres on the southern side of the City of Cortland, New York. The site is surrounded by commercial, residential, and industrial properties. The site overlies the Cortland-Homer-Preble aquifer, a sole source aquifer used as a supply of potable water for the City of Cortland. The supply well for the city is located two miles upgradient of the site. The area currently occupied by the site is the eastern half of a forty-acre parcel of land that in the late 1800s was developed by the Wickwire Brothers, Inc. as an industrial facility for the manufacture of wire, wire products, insect screens, poultry netting, and nails. The eastern half of the property was used primarily as a scrap yard. An on-site pond was used as a cooling pond. The facility was sold to the Keystone Consolidated Industries, Inc in 1968. Keystone closed the facility in 1971, and shortly thereafter, the facility was destroyed by fire. In the early 1970s, Phillip and Harvey Rosen transferred their existing scrap-metal processing operation to the eastern portion of the property. The Rosen Brothers demolished the Wickwire buildings and used the debris to fill in most of the cooling pond. The area where the demolition of the buildings took place was cleared for the development of new industry in 1979, known as the Noss Industrial Park. Rosen Brothers' scrap metal operations included scrap metal processing and automobile crushing. Municipal waste, industrial waste and construction waste were allegedly intermittently disposed of in or on the former cooling pond. Drums were crushed on-site, the contents spilling onto the ground surface. The Rosen brothers were cited for various violations, including illegally dumping into Perplexity Creek Tributary, improperly disposing of waste materials, and operating a refuse disposal area without a permit. Operations on the site cease in 198 5, and the site was abandoned. In 1986, the State conducted an investigation of the site and concluded that hazardous materials were present on the site, including several hundred full and/or leaking drums, transformers filled with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pressurized cylinders of unknown contents. Elevated levels of trichloroethane (TCA), PCBs, anthracene, pyrene, lead, and chromium, in site soil, sediment, and groundwater were detected. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a removal action in 1987. EPA also issued Administrative Orders to Keystone and several additional potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in 1988 and 1989, requiring them to remove the materials previously staged by EPA. This work was completed in April 1990. The site was added to the National Priorities List in March 1989. PRPs conducted a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) from January 1990 to 1997. The PRPs also voluntarily demolished and removed buildings and a smoke stack; removed and recycled 200 tons of scrap materials; emptied and disposed of contents of an abandoned underground storage tank and removed a small concrete oil pit. In August 1997, the EPA removed and recycled over 500 tons of scrap metal and more than 20 tons of tires form the site. A Unilateral Administrative Order was issued in February 1990 and also in March 1998, which required PRPs to perform a removal action. A Record of Decision (ROD) was issued in March 1998. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202609 ​ ​ 80. Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination, Suffolk, NY The Rowe Industries site is located in Sag Harbor, New York. From the 1950s through the early 1960s, Rowe Industries, Inc. manufactured small electric motors at transformers at the 8-acre area. Solvents stored on the property leaked into the groundwater and formed a 500-foot-wide plume that extended northward to Sag Harbor Creek. Groundwater and soil are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Soil cleanup finished in 2003. Contact with contaminated groundwater and soil is no longer a concern. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202330 ​ 81. Sarney Farm, Dutchess, NY The Sarney Farm site is located in Amenia, New York. A former owner was permitted to use a 5-acre section of the site property as a landfill for municipal wastes. However, industrial and municipal wastes were disposed of at locations across the site from 1965 to 1969. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202088 82. Sealand Restoration, Inc., St. Lawrence, NY The Sealand Restoration, Inc. site is located in Lisbon, New York. A disposal facility for hazardous materials, such as petroleum wastes, operated at the 210-acre area. Groundwater was contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Soils were found to contain low levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, heavy metals and phenols, which are chemicals used to make plastics and detergents. Surface water also was found to be contaminated with metals. Following site investigations, a long-term cleanup remedy was put in place. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202090 ​ 83. Shenandoah Road Groundwater Contamination, Dutchess, NY The Shenandoah Road Ground Water Contamination site is located in East Fishkill, New York, in an area known as Shenandoah. The site is an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected residential well drinking water. Tests showed that 60 residential drinking water wells in the area exceeded maximum levels for tetrachloroethene (PCE) and/or trichloroethene (TCE), harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in industrial solvents. PCE is considered a potential human carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the levels detected during testing indicated an immediate threat to public health. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Site cleanup and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204269 84. Sidney Landfill, Delaware, NY The Sidney Landfill site is located in Sidney, New York. The 74-acre area includes a 20-acre former landfill. It accepted municipal and commercial waste, including waste oils, from 1964 until 1972. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201764 ​ 85. Sinclair Refinery, Allegany, NY The 100-acre Sinclair Oil Refinery site is situated between the Genesee River and South Brooklyn Avenue, one-half mile south of downtown Wellsville, in Allegany County, New York. The northerly flowing Genesee River forms the eastern and southern boundaries of the site, South Brooklyn Avenue forms the western boundary, and an old refinery access road forms the northern boundary. The site consists of two areas: a 90-acre refinery area and a 10-acre landfill area. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. A site inspection by EPA, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Atlantic Richfield (ARCO), the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), in June 2012 confirmed that all systems were operating as designed and are protective of human health and the environment. Environmental easements/restrictive covenants are in place on all the site properties. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202093 86. Smithtown Ground Water Contamination Suffolk, NY he Smithtown Ground Water Contamination site is located in the villages of Nissequogue and Head of the Harbor, and the hamlet of St. James, on Long Island in eastern New York state. The site consists of an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected local drinking water supplies. Groundwater is contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE), a solvent used in dry cleaning and metal cleaning. EPA connected affected residents to public water supplies and provided bottled water. EPA is also conducting long-term groundwater and surface water monitoring and putting controls in place to restrict the use of contaminated water. During its research, EPA could not identify the source of the contamination or a plume reaching groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204148 87. SMS Instruments, Inc., Suffolk, NY The SMS Instruments site is located in Suffolk County, New York. The site is the location of an active industrial facility that includes a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. The primary operation at the site has been the overhauling of military aircraft components. Overhauling operations include cleaning, painting, degreasing, refurbishing, metal machining and testing. Facility operations contaminated groundwater and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201325 88. Solvent Savers, Chenango, NY The Solvent Savers site covers 13 acres in Lincklaen, New York. Solvent Savers, Inc. operated a chemical waste recovery facility at the site for reprocessing or disposal of industrial solvents and other wastes from about 1967 to 1974. Operations included distillation to recover solvents for reuse, drum reconditioning, and burial of liquids, solids, sludges and drums in several on-site areas. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediments and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Cleanup activities and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201687 ​ 89. Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY The Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination site is located in North Hempstead, New York. The quarter-acre area includes an active dry-cleaning business and an adjacent one-story boiler/storage building. As a result of past disposal practices, tetrachloroethene (PCE), a volatile organic compound (VOC), migrated from the subsurface soils into the indoor air environments of nearby buildings and the groundwater, resulting in a significant threat to public health. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204167 ​ ​ 90. Tri-Cities Barrel Co., Inc., Broome, NY The Tri-Cities Barrel site is located in Fenton, New York. Used drums were reconditioned at the facility. The wastewater from the cleaning of the drums was discharged into unlined lagoons and allowed to evaporate. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201830 91. Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1, Broome, NY The Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 site is located in Vestal, New York. Well 1-1 is one of three production wells in Water District 1 intended to provide drinking water to several water districts in the Vestal area. The well is moderately contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The site also originally included Well 4-2 in Water District 4. However, EPA designated this well as a separate Superfund site, the Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site, when sampling indicated that two separate sources contaminated Well 1-1 and Well 4-2. Well 1-1 has pumped groundwater into the Susquehanna River since 1980 to prevent the contaminant plume from affecting other District 1 wells. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. There are currently no human or environmental exposures to contaminated groundwater and soils. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202228 92. Volney Municipal Landfill, Oswego, NY The 85-acre Volney Landfill site is located in Volney, New York. Landfilling operations took place at an unlined disposal area on site from 1969 to 1983. The landfill accepted wastes from homes, businesses and light industry. However, from 1974 to 1975, the landfill accepted up to 8,000 barrels containing chemical residues from a local hazardous waste treatment facility. Of these, allegedly 200 barrels contained liquids of unknown volume and composition. Also, from 1976 to 1978, the landfill accepted an industrial sludge, which was later identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste. Oswego County terminated disposal operations at the landfill in 1983 and finished closure of the site in 1985. After investigations, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater and leachate treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201836 93. Waste Management, Inc Niagara, NY The Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York. The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill. The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed. Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site. After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded. The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004. Long-term monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266 94. York Oil Co., Franklin, NY The York Oil Co. site is located in Franklin County, New York. The York Oil Company recycled waste oil at this 17-acre area from 1962 until 1975. Facility operators collected crankcase and industrial oils, some containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from sources in New England and New York. They stored or processed the oils at the site. The recycled PCB-contaminated oil was sold as No. 2 fuel oil or used in dust control for unpaved roads nearby. During heavy rains and spring thaws, the oil-water mixture in the lagoons would often overflow onto surrounding lands and into adjacent wetlands, which the company purchased in 1964. A state road crew first reported contamination at the site in 1979. After emergency actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201202 95. Action Anodizing, Plating, & Polishing Corp., Suffolk, NY The Action Anodizing, Plating, and Polishing Corp. (AAPP) site is located in Copiague, New York. Since 1968, AAPP has been the sole operator at the 1-acre site. AAPP’s operations primarily involved sulfuric acid anodizing of aluminum parts for the electronics industry, cadmium plating, chromate conversion coatings, metal dyeing and vapor degreasing. During a site inspection in January 1980 by the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS), it was discovered that rinse water from AAPP’s operations was discharging directly into underground leaching pits. Under the direction and approval of the SCDHS in 1980, AAPP excavated the pits and backfilled them with clean sand and gravel. In 1985, AAPP expanded its building over the location of the former leaching pits. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202634 96. Anchor Chemicals, Nassau, NY The Anchor Chemicals site is located in Hicksville, New York. Chemical blending and packaging operations there led to soil and ground water contamination. In 1995, a short-term cleanup called a removal action dug up and removed about 21 tons of contaminated sediments from four dry wells. Ground water sampling in 1996 and 1997 confirmed that the site no longer poses an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in 1999. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201324 ​ 97. Batavia Landfill, Orleans, NY The Batavia Landfill site is located in Genesee County, New York. From the 1960s until 1980, several operations dumped industrial wastes at the 35-acre landfill, contaminating soils, sediment, surface water and groundwater with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Cleanup has included consolidation of contaminated soils and wastes under a multi-layered landfill, collection and off-site disposal of leachate, wetlands restoration and groundwater monitoring. Long-term operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in November 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201766 ​ 98. BEC Trucking, Broome, NY The BEC Trucking site is located on Stewart Road in Vestal, New York. In the mid-1960s, a trucking company filled in 3.5 acres of marshland with various materials to raise the ground level. BEC Trucking used the property for truck body manufacturing, painting and vehicle maintenance. These operations generated hazardous wastes, which were stored on-site. To clean up the site, the property owner removed waste drums and placed stained soil in storage drums, which the EPA later removed. No other cleanup actions were required. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 1992. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202235 ​ 99. BioClinical Laboratories, Inc., Suffolk, NY he Bioclinical Laboratories, Inc. (BCL) site is located in Bohemia, New York. The site is a rental property within a 10-unit, single-story building on a 2.6-acre paved lot. BCL formulated, mixed, repackaged and distributed chemicals there from 1978 to 1981. Sampling found a range of organic contaminants, including solvents, in the facility’s sanitary systems. In July 1981, a fire destroyed much of BCL's inventory. Following removal of fire-damaged containers and industrial wastes from the facility’s sanitary systems, EPA determined that no further cleanup was required. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1994. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202236 ​ 100. C & J Disposal Leasing Co. Dump, Madison, NY The C&J Disposal site is located in the Town of Eaton, Madison County, New York, near the intersection of Routes 12B and 46. The site included a rectangular disposal trench which measured approximately 140 feet by 40 feet. The disposal trench was situated between a former railroad bed and an active agricultural field, and was on property immediately adjacent to residential property owned by C&J Leasing of Paterson, New Jersey. Approximately 100 feet south of where the trench is located is a small pond and adjacent wetlands which drain to Woodman Pond, a back-up water supply for the Village of Hamilton. There are twelve residences in the vicinity and downgradient of the site which use private wells as their source of drinking water. During the 1970s, the trench area was used for the disposal of industrial wastes, although never licensed or permitted for that purpose. In March 1976, C&J Leasing was observed dumping what appeared to be paint sludges and other liquid industrial waste materials into the trench. An inspection of the site by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the Village of Hamilton engineer revealed approximately 100 drums lying in a pool of liquid waste. The trench was subsequently covered with fill, reportedly by C&J Leasing, apparently burying the drums observed in March 1976. Sampling was conducted at the site by NYSDEC in 1985 and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1986. Surficial soil samples obtained from the site revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, phthalates, various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and lead. One of the phthalates, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and elevated levels of lead were detected in the sediments of the small pond. The site was placed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in March 1989. In April 1989, prior to the start of an EPA remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), the site was subject to an unauthorized excavation by the principals of C&J Leasing, leaving two large holes and three stockpiles of soil and waste material. The drums that were believed to have been previously buried may have been removed at this time, or earlier, and taken off-site. An extensive follow-up investigation failed to determine where the drums may have been taken. The site was cleaned up in 1993 and removed from the NPL in 1994. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202366 ​ 101. Clothier Disposal, Oswego, NY The Clothier Disposal site is a 15-acre privately-owned dump site, 6 acres of which were used from the early 1970s to 1984 to dispose of demolition debris, household wastes, junk vehicles, and approximately 2,200 drums of hazardous chemical waste from the Pollution Abatement Services, Inc. (PAS) site, which is also listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1973, the Oswego County Health Department discovered drums containing various amounts of waste from the PAS site at the Clothier Disposal site and reported it to state authorities. In 1976, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) brought a lawsuit against the owner of the property for operating an illegal dump. Subsequently, a temporary permit was granted to clean up the site. From 1977 to 1980, the owner made an attempt to clean up the property. These efforts largely entailed breaking open and draining drums and burying or covering exposed wastes. In 1985, NYSDEC staged and characterized the wastes and drum contents. During these activities, it was discovered that approximately 80 drums were in danger of rupturing; these drums had to be placed in new containers immediately. It was also reported that prior to staging and sampling, up to 90 drums had already ruptured and their contents had leaked onto the ground. The site was listed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) on June 1, 1996. Residents in the area rely on private wells for drinking water. A wetland passes through the site to the west of the area used for waste disposal. Ox Creek flows through the site, feeding into the Oswego River, and a portion of the site is located within a 100-year flood plain. What is the current site status? The site was addressed through federal and potentially responsible parties' actions in two stages: initial actions and a long-term remedial action focused on cleanup of the entire site. Initial Actions: During 1986, drums were moved to a centralized on-site location. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs), later removed 1,858 drums of waste. In 1987 and 1988, EPA removed remaining drums and visibly-contaminated soil and debris associated with the drums. Long-term Cleanup: In 1989, a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, was completed. The RI/FS concluded that as a result of the removal of the drums and associated contaminated soil, only residual contamination remained. Accordingly, EPA selected a remedy in the site that included regrading and placement of a 1-foot soil cover over residually-contaminated areas and revegetating the site; putting in erosion control measures, as needed, on the embankment sloping toward Ox Creek; institutional controls to prevent the use of the underlying groundwater or any land use involving significant disturbance of the soil cover and long-term ground-water, soil, sediment and surface water monitoring. Following completion of site cleanup activities in 1994, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996 What's being done to protect human health and the environment? Grading activities for the soil cover uncovered seven drums. The drums and surrounding soil were loaded into dumpsters and removed in 1992. Long-term monitoring and inspection of the site, which started in 1994, led to the discovery of three buried drums. The drums were dug up, overpacked and removed from the site. As a precaution, a limited-area geophysical investigation was undertaken to determine the possible presence of other buried drums. This investigation led to the discovery of buried metallic debris, which was subsequently removed from the site. EPA has since finished four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedy is protect public health and the environment and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in March 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment. Groundwater samples collected in 2014 indicated that the groundwater now meets cleanup standards. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/CurSites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0201192 ​ 102. Conklin Dumps, Broome, NY The Conklin Dumps site originally consisted of two landfilled areas totaling about 37 acres, referred to as the "Upper Landfill" and the "Lower Landfill." It is believed that only municipal solid waste was disposed of in the Lower Landfill, which was operated between 1964 and 1969. The Lower Landfill contained approximately 33,000 cubic yards of wastes before it was excavated and consolidated with the Upper Landfill in 1993. The Upper Landfill contained approximately 72,000 cubic yards of waste before it was consolidated with the Lower Landfill. It is believed that some industrial wastes were co-disposed with municipal solid wastes in the Upper Landfill. Testing conducted by Broome County found the ground water to be contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Leachate from the site drains into Carlin Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River. Approximately 700 people live within 1 mile of the site. The closest residents live 1/4 mile from the Upper Landfill's boundary. Approximately 2,000 people depend on wells within 3 miles of the site for their drinking water. The area immediately surrounding the Upper Landfill is proposed for development as an industrial park. The U.S. Department of the Interior has designated a large wetland on the site as an important biological resource. Site Responsibility: This site was addressed through federal, state, and municipal actions. What is the current site status? The site was addressed in a single, long-term remedial phase focused on cleanup of the entire site. Long-Term Cleanup: Following a remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s 1991 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included capping the landfills, pumping and collecting leachate, and treating the leachate off site at a publicly owned treatment works. In 1992, EPA updated the remedy to focus on excavation of the Lower Landfill, consolidation of the excavated Lower Landfill contents onto the Upper Landfill, capping of the Upper Landfill, and construction of a leachate collection and treatment system. Following the completion of cleanup activities in 1994, EPA removed the site from the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1997. What's being done to protect human health and the environment? The Lower Landfill was excavated and placed on the Upper Landfill in 1993. The capping of the Upper Landfill finished in 1994. The cap covers about 37 acres. The installation of a leachate collection system and the construction of a pipeline to convey the collected leachate to a local sewage treatment plant finished in January 1996. To date, about 70,000 gallons of leachate has been collected and sent for treatment at the Binghamton-Johnson City sewage treatment plant in Vestal, New York. An estimated 25,000 gallons of leachate will be collected and treated annually for about 30 years, for a total of 750,000 gallons over the life of the project. EPA has conducted four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedies put in place protect public health and the environment, and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in January 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment in the short term. For the site’s remedy to be protective in the long term, the review recommends on-site institutional controls to restrict activities that could affect the integrity of the cap, prohibit the residential use of the site property, and prohibit the installation of groundwater wells for drinking or irrigation until groundwater standards are achieved. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0202329 ​ 103. Hooker (102nd Street,) Niagara, NY The 102nd Street chemical landfill, is a former chemical landfill located on the Niagara River in Niagara Falls, New York. It is almost immediately adjacent to the infamous Love Canal chemical landfill, which are split from each other by the LaSalle Expressway and Frontier Avenue. Hooker Chemical, a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum, and Olin Chemical, who were the original owners of the site, were ordered to clean up the site and pay $16,500,000[1] by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It is a designated Superfund site, and is closed to the public. The 102nd Street landfill consists of two parcels, one owned by Olin Corporation and one owned by Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corporation at an area of 22.1 acres (89,000 m2) total.[2] Unlike Love Canal, which it is directly south of, the facility is still owned by Hooker (Occidental) and Olin, who are in the process of cleaning it up. It is part of the original canal excavation from which the Love Canal landfill takes its name. It currently appears to be a large field, as the chemicals are sealed off and buried underneath the soil. Griffon Park lies directly west, and currently, little residential development lies on either side of the area. The area is monitored with air and ground monitoring devices to measure the toxicity of the site. At an unknown date, chemicals began seeping into the Niagara River. A concrete bulkhead has been constructed on the shore to stop the seepage of chemicals into the river. The area is fenced off on all sides. History The landfill takes its name from 102nd Street, a street that ran through the area before residents were evacuated and homes demolished. The larger portion owned by Hooker was operated from 1943 until 1971.[3] In that time period, 23,500 tons of mixed organic and/or inorganic compounds, solvents and phosphates, and related chemicals were dumped here including brine sludge, fly ash, electrochemical cell parts and related equipment plus 300 tons of hexachlorocyclohexane process cake, including lindane. The smaller portion owned by Olin Corp. operated from 1948 to 1970. 66,000 tons of compounds and elements and an additional 20,000 tons of mercury brine and brine sludge, 1,000+ tons of hazardous chemicals, 16 tons of concrete boiler ash, fly ash and other residual materials were deposited. Currently, the chemicals are sealed off, contaminated soil being removed, and chemicals being removed. The area as of 2008, has been deemed reusable, but no developmental measures have been taken. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/102nd_Street_chemical_landfill ​ 104. Jones Sanitation, Dutchess, NY The Jones Sanitation site is located in Dutchess County, New York. An industrial and septic waste disposal facility operated at the 57-acre area from 1956 to 1977. From the early 1960s through 1979, the landfill accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges generated by Alfa-Laval, formerly known as the DeLaval Separator Co. of Poughkeepsie. These materials were oils and greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, metals from plating operations, pigments, phenols and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including methylene chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene (TCE). EPA has completed cleanup work and took the site off the Superfund program’s National priorities List. Long-term operation and maintenance activities are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202045 ​ 105. Katonah Municipal Well, Westchester, NY The Katonah Municipal Well site is located in Katonah, New York. The City of New York (NYC) owns the site property. Well sampling identified several volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The contamination was traced to a local septic waste collection facility. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 2000. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202269 106. Marathon Battery Corp., Putnam, NY The Marathon Battery Company site is located in Cold Spring, New York. The 70-acre area includes a now-demolished nickel-cadmium battery plant and 11 surrounding acres, the Hudson River in the vicinity of the Cold Spring pier and a series of river backwater areas known as Foundry Cove and Constitution Marsh. The battery facility operated from 1952 to 1979, producing military and commercial batteries. Facility operations contaminated soil on the plant grounds and adjacent properties and sediments in Foundry Cove, adjacent marshland and the Hudson River with heavy metals and groundwater with a volatile organic compound (VOC). Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in October 1996. The site is now ready for reuse. East Foundry Marsh and East Foundry Cove have been acquired by Scenic Hudson, a conservation organization. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201491 107. Niagara County Refuse, Niagara, NY he Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York. The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill. The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed. Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site. After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded. The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004. Long-term monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266 ​ 108. North Sea Municipal Landfill, Suffolk, NY The North Sea Municipal Landfill is located in Southampton, New York. The 131-acre North Sea Landfill Superfund site is an inactive municipal landfill owned and operated by the Town of Southampton, New York. The landfill accepted trash, construction debris and septic system waste from 1963 to 1995. The site consists of four areas: Cell No. 1, Cell No. 2, Cell No. 3 and former septic sludge or scavenger lagoons. Site monitoring found that disposal activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and soil with heavy metals. Monitoring also found evidence of leachate from the landfill. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included closure of Cell No. 1 by constructing a landfill cap and perimeter gas venting system. EPA determined that groundwater required no action because contaminant levels were within EPA's acceptable risk range. All cells are now permanently closed and Cells No. 2 and No. 3 are no longer part of the site. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation regulates those cells under its municipal waste landfill closure program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202198 109. Radium Chemical Co., Inc., Queens, NY The Radium Chemical Company (RCC) site is located in Queens, New York. The site consisted of an abandoned building on an approximately 1/3 of an acre of land. From the mid-1950s through 1983, RCC operated at the site, leasing specially packaged radium to hospitals for use in the treatment of cancer. When it was abandoned, the facility contained a large quantity of radium-226 sealed in small metal tubes or rods referred to as "needles," totaling about 120 curies. These metal tubes were repackaged to prevent the release of radioactivity and were removed and shipped to a facility in Nevada dedicated to the disposal of radioactive wastes. After these immediate actions were performed to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup took place focusing on the removal of residual radioactivity at the site. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 1995. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202850 ​ 110. Suffern Village Well Field, Rockland, NY (REMOVED) The 30-acre Suffern Village Well Field site is located in Suffern, New York. The Village of Suffern operates four production wells that provide water to about 12,000 people at a rate of almost 2 million gallons per day. In 1978, the State detected trichloroethane, a volatile organic compound (VOC), in the public water distribution system. The Tempcon Corporation, a small oil burner reconditioning business, was identified as the source of the contamination. The company is located 2,500 feet uphill of the well field. Until 1979, the company used trichloroethane-based solvents in their process, and discharged waste fluids into a seepage disposal pit.. All residents in the area use municipally supplied water. Site cleanup has been completed. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1993. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202277 111. Syosset Landfill, Nassau, NY (REMOVED) The 38-acre Syosset Landfill site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. The landfill operated from about 1933 to 1975. Between 1933 and 1967, no restrictions were imposed on the types of wastes accepted at the landfill. Waste types included commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, agricultural, sludge material and ash. In 1967, with the opening of another landfill east of Syosset in Old Bethpage, the town stopped using the landfill for disposal of domestically generated wastes. Some industrial wastes continued to be disposed of at the landfill until its closure in 1975. Following the site’s cleanup, EPA took it off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in April 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201187 112. Tronic Plating Co., Inc., Suffolk, NY (REMOVED) The Tronic Plating Co., Inc. site is located in Farmingdale, New York. Tronic Plating occupied the southeastern corner of a long building in an industrial park area from 1968 to 1984. It provided electroplating and metal protective coating services for the electronics industry. The half-acre site consists of the long building, two inside aboveground storage tanks, four underground leaching pools and a storm drain in the paved area northeast of the building. Following site investigations and removal of contaminated waste, EPA determined that the site did not pose a significant threat to human health and the environment. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 2001. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201346 ​ 113. Vestal Water Supply Well, Broome, NY (REMOVED) The Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site is located in Vestal, New York. The site is a municipal well contaminated by a bulk chemical handling facility. After contamination was discovered in 1980, the well was taken out of service. The well was returned to service in 1988. The well had been contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Similar contaminants were detected in Well 1-1, which is located in Water District 1. The two were originally listed as one Superfund site and were later separated into two Superfund sites: Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 and Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Following the completed construction of the site’s remedy, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1999. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202152 114. Warwick Landfill, Orange, NY (REMOVED) The Warwick Landfill site is located in Warwick, New York. The site is a 19-acre unlined landfill. In the mid-1950s, the Town of Warwick leased the property from the Penaluna family and used the area as a refuse disposal area. Evidence indicates that there were some hazardous materials disposed of at the landfill during this period. The Town of Warwick operated the landfill until 1977, at which time the owner leased it to Grace Disposal and Leasing, Ltd. In 1979, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) sampled leachate seeping from the site and detected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals and phenols. New York State subsequently issued a restraining order and closed the landfill. Following investigations, the site’s remedy was put in place. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2001. 115. Wide Beach Development, Erie, NY https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201695 https://www.epa.gov/superfund/national-priorities-list-npl-sites-state#NY

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // The Woodstock Library

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE WOODSTOCK LIBRARY FLOATING BOUNCY CHAIR JUNE 2016 For the 85th Annual Woodstock Library Fair Hudson Valley artists were commissioned to repurpose a heap of old metal folding chairs for a silent auction to benefit the library. I made this floating bouncy chair using studio scraps and discount bungee cords from P&T Surplus in Kingston, NY. Fellow artist and Vice President of Friends of The Woodstock Library Michael Hunt says “It's the coolest motherfucking chair.”

  • SHIRT FACTORY CENTENIAL | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE SHIRT FACTORY CENTENNIAL ​ KINGSTON, NY September 16, 2017, 2018 ​ For The Shirt Factory Centennial Celebration I tied 100 flags together and looped them through the building.

  • LINDA MARY MONTANO INTERVIEW | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... NINA ISABELLE INTERVIEWED BY LINDA MARY MONTANO 2020 transcribed by Brian McCorkle L: We ask the angels to inspire us. So Nina, um, tell me the story of you and Sylvia and her illness. ​ N: Well she had never been sick, really. Never really been to the doctor or, I mean she'd had like a cold or a couple of fevers in her lifetime, she's 9 now. So I usually, when she would get a fever in the past, I would just, wait it out. We never really went to doctors - I would of course if it was an emergency but we never had to. In this case she had a fever on Monday morning so she stayed home from school and - I just kept taking her temperature that day and thinking that she would probably just have a regular fever and it would just be a couple of days and she would be back in school. By that night her fever was getting higher it was like 103 and 104, and the next day, at the end of the second day, her fever was 105. So I brought her to the emergency room in Kingston and they took her temperature in the waiting room and it was 105. And, they gave her some Tylenol and Motrin, which i'd been giving her at home also. When the doctor came to see her at the emergency room her fever had come down to about 102.7 - and they tested her for strep and the viruses by doing nose and throat swabs - and they sent those to the machine in the lab to determine if she had strep or any viruses - and those came back negative and they listened to her lungs and they couldn't hear anything. And they sent us home saying that she had another virus that their machine just couldn't detect and to just continue treating her with Tylenol and Motrin or Ibuprofen. I had the feeling that something was wrong and that they were missing something and I wasn't in the right mindframe to say so or speak up - it was like every time I went to form my thoughts and say something to the doctor it was like he was talking and I just couldn't figure out what I needed to say or wanted to say - it was like I had a feeling something was wrong but - I think I thought I said that having a 105 fever was pretty high for a virus. And he said "Oh, no it wasn't 105" And I was just thinking, well it just was in the waiting room with the nurses, but he was saying it wasn't. It was this weird feeling of believing him because he was a doctor but knowing that he was wrong when he said that she didn't have a fever of 105 with such authority. So, when we left I was really irritated by that whole experience. The next morning she was still not better, she was - I would look at her and she would kind of look like she was blue, and I would look again and she didn't look blue. So, there was again this feeling of, did I, am I correct in that? It was this continual process of checking in with my perceptions and not really knowing what was real, but also being a person that has experienced a lot of things that have caused me to learn to trust myself. So it was like a whole other level of that way of being. So I took her to the pediatrician that afternoon, and he, by that time she had a rash on her body and her mouth looked weird and she had been throwing up all day, not able to keep any fluid down. And he tested her again for strep and his machine said that she tested positive for strep and he said it looked like she had scarlet fever because she had a rash all over herself. And her tongue was white. So he gave her some Amoxycillin to take, and I thought "Oh, well, good, so it was something" - I knew it was something - I was feeling hopeful that this would - that she would take these antibiotics and he said they would work really quickly and that she would turn around really quickly and that scarlet fever isn't really as big of a scary deal as it sounds, and that it responds quickly to the antibiotics and she should feel better the next morning. So she still wasn't able to keep any fluid down, she was looking blue and green and really pale and really lethargic - her breathing was starting to be really rapid, and it seemed as if she in pain. She kept saying she had pain in her lung, I didn't know it was her lung then, I thought it was her stomach, where she was indicating. So, we got home and I tried to give her the antibiotic and she just threw it up, so I called the doctor and asked how long does it need to stay in her stomach until it had gotten into her system and they said "Oh it should be fine, just give her another one in the morning." So I was just sort of getting her ready to go to sleep and in the morning we would get up and she would be better, or at least starting to be better. But I had this feeling, like maybe I should take her into the hospital again because something just didn't seem right. So I kept going back and forth with that thought, "just wait until morning she'll be better" and "no you should take her in again." But then also we've already been to two doctors and they'd sent us home and it just seemed ridiculous to go to a third emergency room after hours. And I didn't want to go back to the Kingston Hospital because they already missed the fact that she had strep and sent us home and said she had nothing wrong with her. ​ I was really on the fence about going back to the hospital - I just felt like they were going to say "oh nothing's wrong - go home and wait it out" - but I think this is the scariest part of it is that I almost didn't go to the hospital. I decided to go to Poughkeepsie, which is a half an hour drive, but I knew it was a better hospital, and by the time we got there there was all kinds of Christmas traffic because it was night, it was December 16th or 17th. She wasn't able to walk or move, and she had turned blue, we pulled into the parking lot - I didn't know if I should call 911 but I was in the hospital parking lot so I just hoisted her onto my back and fireman carried her from the parking garage to the hospital. It was dark and windy and everything was vacant, it seemed like there were no street lamps. It just seemed really like, time slowed down, like I was carrying this near-lifeless child through this parking lot towards this light of the entrance of the hospital. And I went in the front entrance and they said "This isn't the Emergency Room it's around the other side of the building." So I just quickly turned around and started running as fast as I could with her on my back. And we had to traverse the side of this giant hospital in the dark, like we were going through alleyways with dumpsters, it seemed. And there was just no one around. It just seemed really unbelievable - one of those moments when time is just stretching out and you're aware of the urgency and ridiculousness of your situation. So I got into the Emergency Room door which was around the other side of the building it was a really small entrance. And they wheeled up a wheelchair behind me and I plunked her down into it and they saw that she was blue and not moving and didn't really look alive so they quickly hooked her up to a monitor and it said that her heart rate was 180 and her oxygen level was like 58 or something, really low. They kept hitting the machine saying "this can't be right - this can't be right" and a couple of them were just taking their time, trying to get the machine to be accurate. Then one nurse came rushing out and she said "The machine's fine! Get Doctor -" um, the pediatrician who was on call there, I forget his name. And they rushed her back there and they immediately gave her a shot of Venkomyacin, she'd gone septic and they didn't know, initially, what was wrong with her. They were asking all kinds of questions, had she been exposed to something. They just put her in an ambulance and I got in the front of the ambulance and we rode to Westchester Hospital, and they put her in the intensive care unit for children and we didn't know what was happening at that point. They gave her an ultrasound of her body and it showed that her left lung was full of pus. They couldn't hear that, neither the emergency room or the doctor's office could hear that for some reason when they listened to her chest, I guess because it was so full. So, they drained her lung the next morning by putting her unconscious and putting a tube in. Then she - they showed me a picture of the X-Ray and you could see her esophagus going off at a 45 degree angle from her throat, and her heart was shoved up into her left shoulder area because her lung was so full of pus that it was displacing her heart and her esophagus - it was the worst looking X-Ray I've ever seen. Like a person's body parts all in the wrong spot. It was just this feeling of time being altered and not having any control over the situation and knowing that I needed to be fine with that. L: Nina do you need to take a break right now and put your hands on your heart? And thank yourself for - just thank your heart, thank yourself, just be - gratitude. Thanking Nina. - pause - L: Can you imagine Sylvia in your arms, healed. N: Yeah, and I've recited the facts of this situation so many times and it's much different than the actual experience. L: And what's your feeling today, where are you vibrating with it today? N: I think this whole situation is sort of in another compartment, it's like frozen there for the sake of reflection or study. Because, I don't think I could go around each day actually with this memory in my - like the memory and awareness that I use in my every day life. So, it still feels kind of unreal, and as if it never happened, and also as if it was no big deal at all, and also as if it was a life-changing event. As if there was life before this and life after this. So it has - you know I don't know if it hasn't been enough time but it hasn't settled, it feels like the time that we spent in the hospital was, could have been like an entire year. It could have been 20 years ago, or 3 years ago, or yesterday. It feels like it could have been much longer or much shorter, it feels like it could have been 3 days or an entire year. The time around it and having to do with - everything having to do with this is just warped in this time and space way. L: So there's Nina the mother and there's Nina the artist-mother, and you were able to be in touch with so many people via your iPhone, the group chats. But you also, just from photos and with stories, Nina the artist really came to that situation, in terms of how you dealt with room, and the people and the doctors and the nurses and the visitors, so could you tell me about Nina the artist, in the room with your daughter? N: Yeah I thought about this a lot because I was talking with you Linda on the phone, most days we would check in and you would ask how we were doing and we kept in close touch and I - I remember, I don't know how many years ago it was, but I was talking to you about this time Sylvia and I were in the grocery store. And she was throwing a tantrum, and my cart was full of groceries, and I just had to abandon the cart and leave, these really difficult mothering moments. And you said something like "What would the mother that you would want to be - how would that mother be performing, and how could you perform as a mother in that situation?" And I remember having this huge realization when you said that, that I had a choice how I responded to Sylvia, that I could perform in that moment as a mother having a child who's having a tantrum in the grocery store. Just this realization that performance could be - that could be a coping mechanism - but it's not really a coping mechanism it's like a mechanism, so - ever since that point I've really used that performance mechanism in my mothering, because I've really had to because we wind up in so many difficult situations. And it's not performance in the way of being perfect, it's more like what is my role here and how can I embrace that role? That mechanism of awareness really creates that ability to view multiple possibilities and then choose one. And then even if that possibility that you chose isn't working out - you're still able to step out of that role, view a hundred more possibilities, and chose another one. So it gave me this really maneuverable framework for navigating mothering and life. So I already had been sort of practicing that, in a way that became very natural to my just daily way of going about, that I didn't realize until this latest hospital experience how much I rely on that mechanism as a mother and as an artist and all throughout my life, it's now something that informs my choices and my awareness about my artmaking projects, circumstances and situations I find myself in life, or if I'm envisioning and conceptualizing different possibilitie - that sort of performance mechanism that you introduced me to has really informed my approach to life, mothering, and art. So that was one of my big realizations, in this process, or in this experience. L: You're also a scientist, you know, you're a trained and practicing massage therapist - you're multi-multi leveled, multi-talented, so you have access to so many different personas, and quote characters and other voices that you can use and you really pulled out or pulled into all of them. Because I remember either reading or hearing from you that the scientist was wowing the doctors and nurses and the artist or the artist-mother was creating an installation in the room, the mother was in bed with the daughter - it was just an incredible, incredible experience for us, who knew about it online and knew about it being connected to your heart and to your heart, we all love you, and then Sylvia, and then Brian. So it was just - literally, I couldn't do anything while this was going on, I was just with you every second. I couldn't I couldn't function outside the persona of being Nina's love and Nina's friend. That was my, my practice. N: Yeah it was essential, and I can't even express the web that we all became, people coming and going, so many people were involved and connected and just wanting to help in so many ways - and helping in so many ways, that it was like - I'm not a person who's able to just sit around, and there wasn't a lot of sleeping over the 17 days but - it was Christmas and we had construction paper, we were making daisy chains and decorating the room, and the room became filled with hanging paper chains and cut-outs and it became a really exciting room that way. We were studying all the different antibiotics she was on and what their scope of treatments were - which things they would kill and which things they wouldn't. Making lists and crossing off things because the doctors couldn't really - they weren't really able to identify which bacteria had caused the lung to fill up so we were - I was trying to figure that out by processes of elimination. And that became these long long lists and learning about how antibiotics can have antagonistic effects on each other and it seemed like the two that they were giving her were canceling each other out and they would add a third one and the fever still wouldn't come down and the white blood cells would still go higher - she was on three antibiotics and it was just getting worse. So it was definitely entering science mode, definitely entering busy mode of just manipulating material with my hands non-stop, talking to people, just really being outside of myself. And I was remembering, I'd worked many years ago in search and rescue in Yosemite Valley, and there was a similar thing that happens there when there's an emergency and you just get down to doing the work. And that I remember that time shifts, time stops, and you just have - it's like everything's in slow motion. So I guess as a scientist and artist who's thinking and working with perception -in this case I'm still stuck thinking about the role of perception, I'm thinking about why we perceive certain situations - why time is warped and bent, and for what purpose, what parts of us make that happen? And how can we control that or maximize it? L: Do you think your early training as a gymnast and as a high-flying, risk-taking performer, that that internal persona allows you to confront high-flying life-art issues, in this case? All of your past actions and trainings came together. N: Yeah, I think - my Dad was a gymnast, an acrobat and a trampolinist, and so from the time I was little he would be tossing me up in the air and having me balance on his hands - we would be doing hand balancing and acrobatic things - and training me on trampoline, I would be launching myself in the air. So I was really, had this, I think maybe in a way that puts a person outside of their body, so I had this really strong sense of my physical body, and an equally strong sense of the space outside of my physical body, so it's almost like I inhabited two spaces. So, I think it created the ability to see myself from outside, which is why, Linda, when you introduced the idea of choosing roles, that was really a surprisingly simple thing - as much as I'd been able to see myself from outside my body I had never imagined this possibility of seeing that self choose - make choices. So, as much as I have this experience of being outside my body sort of naturally, I'm missing a lot of experiences that seem very natural for other people that have to do with awareness of choice. So I think it has its pluses and minuses, being disconnected - not disconnected but having a sense of the outside-the-bodiness. L: Is that because there's a level of suspension that comes from having been suspended - it's almost like an angelic timelessness, an angelic suspension. N: Yeah I don't know I've thought about this in relationship to having been a trampolinist because, I remember, when I was maybe 15 or 16 I had quit gymnastics and I just wanted to focus on trampoline. So I was learning these really complicated skills on the trampoline, one of them was a double-twisting double- backflip, which you do in succession with a bunch of other tricks. So it requires jumping up in the air and flipping around two times while you spin around two times. So it takes these really tiny muscle movements and you're going really high in the air, and it's so many tiny movements that it feels like you have a year when you're up in the air doing that trick. I can still, even to this day, feel the microscopic movements inside of my body that you need to do in order to make that trick happen. Yet, in that split second, the amount of time it takes to perform that trick, it expands and it seems like you have, maybe an entire minute or five minutes or something. So, we used to use video cameras to record ourselves and you could see this, just this human going up in the air and spinning around really quickly and then landing. And when you slow motion the thing down you can see: "Oh, my elbow was sticking out, I need to pull my elbow in" - you just saw these really microscopic things that you needed to do with your body, like just tuck your chin in a quarter of an inch or something. So, I thought about this when I was studying body work, and I forget which practioner was talking about people who'd been in car accidents, where their body comes to a direct halt. They've been speeding, and then the physical body comes to a quick halt, that the etheric or energy body continues to move past the car, and outside of their body, and their energy body didn't come to a halt, it just kept kind of gliding into the space in front of them. So, I thought about my experience as a trampolinist and this high-impact kind of jumping, this being-in- the-air, maybe that was happening. We wouldn't call it "traumatic experience" because you were choosing to do it and you didn't usually get hurt but it caused this similar thing to the "outside body" that maybe happens when people are in car crashes or other high-impact injuries or something. It's just a perception of time being weird and altered. And the perception of the body, the physical body and the outer bodies. L: So, it's almost like three personas, I'm sure there are more, there's Nina the artist, with all kinds of things happening in that room: the stars and paper cut- outs, and iPad games, and there's Nina the scientist, which you are also, who's doing all of this medical research, there's Nina the partner with Brian as collaborator, and there's Nina the Mother. There's no which one is second, third fourth, and I'm sure there's more, there's Nina the spiritual seeker. So there's these five to seven, to twenty-faceted - there's Nina the daughter, who's relating to parents what's going on, Nina the communicator. It's this multi-faceted opera of care and love, that is unbelievably fertile, rich, and applaudable. What would be your advice to other mothers, to other fathers, to other others in this situation? What - it's a teaching, what you did, is a teaching, it's a course, you could study what you did for years! What all you went through. What do you think people studying what you did will come away with or learn, or need to learn? N: The first thing that I kept telling other mothers when I would see them is just, "Go to the doctor, don't try to ride it out, it doesn't matter." I have so many friends, myself included, we try to avoid going to the doctor, because maybe it's expensive, or we don't trust them, or something. The first lesson, practical and the lesson that can save the most lives potentially is just go to the Doctor. It doesn't matter if you're wrong, just keep going. If you know that something is wrong don't trust them, just keep going to the Emergency Room over and over and over if you have to. I think that's the most urgent, pressing message that I found myself wanting to tell my other Mom friends. I think I'll probably be more inclined to go to the doctor all the time now. Also, from being involved in athletics we were trained to never go to the doctor, you know. So it was sort of overriding this programming I'd had my entire life that the body is invincible and it can heal itself no matter what, you never need to go to the doctor - that's the most practical advice. And probably I think - I don't know, there were times when I was thinking "I don't know how I'm doing this, I don't know how I'm not falling over or screaming or having an anxiety attack or being really scared or crying." I don't know how all of those things didn't happen, other than to say it was thanks to this performative mechanism that allowed me to really be present with what was happening and to realize I was in control of my anxiety and my fear, and that those sorts of responses wouldn't have any impact on the outcome. So, that sort of awareness and logical thinking kind of let me off the hook. "Oh, I don't need to have anxiety, I can see how that's not useful." L: As a practicing artist, you mention four or five things: screaming, anxiety, et cetera. Do you feel that the coming-down-from-the-suspension, or from twirling or twisting, from being put into the air of this situation; do you feel that those are things you'll be dealing with in your work, or in therapy, or that you will scream in your house when you're alone in your house, or do you feel that these kind of detrituses and these left overs, this material, do you have any idea how you'll be using the material? N: Yeah, I feel like it's probably not ready to come out, like it's sitting, solidifying a little more, I think when it comes out, then, it's going to be really directed, and that might show up in having - I mean I know this from going through things like this in the past that it gives me this ability to be really clear in my impulses and my choices and my instincts. To recognize when an institnctive notion is occurring and to direct it really quickly and not question myself. So, I think maybe all of these sort of difficult experiences in my life are continually fortifying that mechanism of choice-making and embracing and owning decisions and actions. Where there's not really a lot of - it's been training me to function in this way that's just sort of following impulse, but also the impulses have been correct in a lot of ways. Or it's like they're getting to be better, they're not always the most useful or beneficial thing, but it's like honing that mechanism, to where I feel like, eventually, a person, if they keep going through stuff like this for their whole life, might be able to direct that process really effectively. L: And you said persons going through this, I'm kind of thinking, like my brother's a surgeon, and my niece is a pediatrician and an internist: I'm thinking medically right now, and, you had 17 days of really being in close proximity with the medical, more than that, close proximity with people in the medical world. What did you learn from them? N: They have these slogans, like "We operate on Occam's Razor!" L: What was that? N: "Our protocol is developed based on Occam's Razor!" The most likely scenario is the most probable, is probably it, or something. "All of our decisions are informed by protocol, we don't-" they don't use, if they have a hunch or a notion, they have to bend their protocol to sort of force a way for their instinct, whereas operating as an artist I might have an instinct or a notion and I might have to force some sort of rules or material, physical material, to suit my notion. So I could see - just, that they have this kind of comfort with fencing themselves in with this, because it's like life or death, when you're on the fence and making a decision like this about whether a child lives or dies, you can't, as a human, be like, making a quick instinctive decision. Because you're not going to be 100% correct. So they have to put these parameters in place so that they're not accidentally killing children. L: What does that look like? N: They're working with something that's more important I guess, it's not more important, but it's much different than "Oh I'm going to make a sculpture and the welds didn't hold" or "I had the welder set on 4" or something, it's like "Oh I made a mistake" but it's not like somebody's going to live or die because I chose the wrong color or, you know, my seams didn't hold, or someone disagreed with what I was doing, or one of those things like, as an artist, being misunderstood, like worst case scenario you do a project, no one understands it, everyone misunderstands it, it fails, or something, it's like "So fucking what" there's no children who just died so it doesn't really matter, so that's sort of liberating. L: It makes us glad to be artists? N: I guess so, not to say that it's just frivolous, I think we're all searching for real useful ways of going about that translate to how to live life effectively, and that can save lives. L: I always felt that I wanted the same level of integrity as my brother had when he was doing surgery on a child. I wanted that same brilliance, that same, integrity again, that same attention, that same, care, that same, knowledge. Because that's a level to aim for, and that's a level that I could feel in a family member and want to emulate. N: Yeah it's probably great if we have that level of care and awareness in everything we do in our lives, and I agree. Because even, I guess on the surface it doesn't seem like anybody lives or dies based on any of my successes or failures with all of my art projects, but they're, they're little spirit ideas, little spirit babies or something. So it's, I mean, I guess it would just be, if we were to decide that human spirit, human beings were different or more important than idea-babies or spirit- babies. It's probably not true that there's a hierarchy and one is more important than the other. L: But the endurance that you participated in with your daughter and with your partner, Brian, and your ex-husband being there also in the picture, has, was an invitation to the next level of excellence. Because there's a graduation from the heart, our hearts, our hearts expand from these life endurances. And then it's like the art, the art will, the art will benefit. Or the life will benefit. N: Yeah, and that's really sticking with me, more and more, as I know you, and am influenced by you. There really is no difference between my life projects and my art projects, and that they both deserve equal levels of integrity. L: How is your relationship with Sylvia altered, changed, moved into or out of, or... what's new, what's old, what's? N: Well, I've made a point of, I have my observations of she and I's relationship, and I've tried to be really clear in not articulating her experience as my experience, or my observation of her experience may not be correct. So I, kind of refrain from imposing my observation of her experience, and what it might be. I witnessed her working with certain things in this circumstance, being confronted with things she had no choice over. Kids are given a lot of encouragement in this era, lately, that they have choice, and that they have choices about their bodies and what things they say are okay and what things are not okay. That they need to make good choices and use their voice, and make these choices. So she's been raised that way, except in this case, she was put in a position where she didn't have any choice, they had to take blood when they had to, and they had to do stuff to her, she didn't choose, and she didn't want to. And so it was difficult for me to watch that sort of reckoning and realize, we've been wanting to give our kids this, idealized notion that they have choice and autonomy and their body is theirs, and it's all great and well-meaning things, except in a case like this, you also have to be able to give over, to give over control of the things that you can control, and to know the difference - the ability to know, when you don't have a choice, and the ability to be okay. So she's 9, and she hasn't had many experiences like that, so watching her, have a crash course in that, is one things that I noticed, as far as she and I's relationship, that's a tough one to speak about. We're still so connected, that we sort of have an understanding of each other and our relationship to each other that's unlanguageable. Just, feeling and knowing each other in a way that is still really instinctive and connected in some, sphere that doesn't have language. And then also experiencing the stuff that does have language, just being really tired of whining, and all of the regular mother things, like really needing her to do what you're asking her to do, and being really tired, with those regular sorts of parenting things. L: The ability - what would you say to mothers about honesty? What I've observed in your relationship with Sylvia, in general, you have a rule that being honest and forthright and saying the truth, no matter how truthful or puzzling or upsetting or shocking it might be, never stops you, and so in a way that really helped, because I could see that some people might not have been as able to be truthful in the circumstance you were in - to talk about blood and guts, and sickness and life, in front of your daughter and also - anyway, I think you're very brave. And would you recommend - how would you get other people to be as brave as you? And is that from being suspended in the air? N: I don't know. L: Why are you so brave and how can you teach that bravery? N: I don't know because, brave, I might have just learned it, you know, parenting, you learn a little bit of it from the way your parents raised you, and some of that is good and bad. I mean, my Dad was kind of a fearless person and he talked a lot about violence and fighting and blood, so a lot of his speaking was really straight forward and graphic and, he had been in a lot of fist fights and he was kind of a rough and tumble person, and his father was - he had a lot of experiences growing up in a tough area where he, found a finger, this guy jumped him and he punched him and just kept punching him, and so, I just grew up with these - I kind of question it now. That is a defense mechanism, I think, to speak about bloody and graphic things with such ease, it's partly conditioned, I don't think it's great, because as I've gotten older and I've gotten more respect for the body, I think that's, not such a healthy response, to be so vocally graphic about things that are so important. But that's how he was, and my family is still kind of like that, so I don't know, I guess the other thing is being disinhibited, which could be from head injuries, or it might just be a way or being that I am, I can't really not say what I'm thinking, and I never think it - I think it benefits everybody involved to know the most information, and if everyone said what they were thinking, I think everyone would appreciate that. L: Ra, ra! Applause for all that, fabulous, thank you for mentoring that. And I'm sure those nurses were applauding you, and doctors. N: Yeah, maybe doctors and nurses are used to that, sort of, speaking. L: How did the animus of Brian's presence, who actually has a lot of anima in him, how did you feel, he supported you, and how would you recommend, future people who would be in a similar situation to ask for the kind of support you got from him? N: I mean, he was just continually there, there wasn't a question of whether he would be there for us, he just was, and that was really comforting. The feeling of, I didn't even have to ask, there was no resentment, it was just, straight up, unconditional help and support. Neither of us, I mean we were tired, but that wasn't even an issue. So I think, just having another person there was really great, and really gave me a lot of stability and comfort. And Sylvia too, he was able to, a lot of times, defuse things that were happening, then he would pick up, and start reading books to her and stuff. I guess, just having the ability to collapse a little bit and know that somebody else was going to be there. L: If you were to interview Nina right now, what would you ask her, about this experience? N: I would ask her, how is she going to be, how is she going to be better the next time this happens? What is the thing to carry and learn, the next thing? I don't even know if there's a way to answer that because it will just evolve over time. Or, how will she, I wonder if these spheres of reality will, over time, converge? And how would she know if that has happened and what would it matter? L: What does converge mean, to you? N: I guess the experience is kind of fragmented from my awareness, I notice when I start to retell the facts of this experience, that they're kept in another compartment of my awareness that's really far from the awareness I use to go around in my daily life. I wonder if there will come a point when the distance between those two modes of functioning becomes closer. L: What does she say to Nina? N: She would say, "Why does that matter? Between those things. Why are you fascinated with where things are, the location of perceptions? Why do you care so much about wanting to know where things are and how they get from one place to another?" L: I could answer that. N: You could? L: I am Nina, and I am up in the air! My dance threw me up in the air, and I don't know where in the name of God I am! I'm twisting, I'm turning, I'm trampolining and I'm jumping, and I'm up and I'm turning around and I'm falling down - I don't know where I am, and the distance, relations, so that's - N: Right, that makes sense, thanks Linda. ​ L: My God! My God! Oh my God, where am I? What's the relation to the next - I'm an angel, flying. ​ N: Hm, good point. ​ L: So, Nina says to all parents [long pause] You talked about money today, before we began, it was so beautiful, and you talked about bills coming to you, through her birth father, that she had insurance, it was so touching, you talked about money, because most people are just like cray-cray about, totally cray-cray. And you said, with all beauty, yeah there was one bill, about $15,000 or eighteen and then you said, I want you to close your eyes, and feel this, you said "I don't care if it was a million dollars, I don't care if I had to pay for the rest of my life, if it was a million dollars, I would pay and pay, because it was my daughter's life that was saved." And that's, that's the other Nina. That's the new Nina. ​ N: Yeah, it was a perspective shift, at the same time we were in the hospital my septic system was blowing up in my house, and, you know, before we went to the hospital that was a terrible ordeal, and, you know, I hired this plumber, it was $300, not fixed, hired another guy, $900, kind of fixed, you need another thing, it's going to be $8000. And then, that very day, "your septic needs to be rebuilt, it's $8000" - we go to the hospital. I was on the verge of caring about that, you know, and in relationship to something like this, those other things that would really just be a really big deal in a person's life, just doesn't matter. I don't know how that will happen, it just will, I don't even care, right now. We're just not using much water for now, it's fine. So then all these other things, oh we hit a deer! I had to have my car repaired, just all these other things that at other points in my life would be like "Oh this is terrible, why is all this terrible stuff happening?" And now, it's like, it's like nothing, it doesn't even matter, all this stuff that used to matter, it just doesn't. ​ L: You know I'm thinking like Castaneda's, commandment, that we keep death on our left shoulder, is so lovely, because, if, and sometimes the translation is "Oh my God! Fill-in-the-blank is going to die! And I'm so, cray-cray, about what I'm thinking about Fill-in-the-blank right now!" But, if I was looking through the lens of, they're going to die some day, how would that change my direction, my position, my being-in-the-air, my endurance ​ N: That's another one of those magical Linda-perspective-shifting mechanisms ​ L: And you did it, you did it, you had a perspective shift, you had a large shift, and a very very powerful life-death journey, endurance. ​ N: Maybe the distance between those spheres of perception I was trying to measure and locate will become evident when I go back to being comfortable and I get to this point where I start to get mad about some stupid thing like, I'm thinking of my neighbor lady was mad because we drove on her yard and it made a dent on her lawn and she was so mad. And I could just sit there while she was yelling at me thinking "wow, she cares about different things than I do." So maybe when the experience, the near-death experiences and the mundane idiocy of daily life problems like holes in your yard, when those things start to become so far apart that you can't see the near-death experience any more and you start to care about a hole in your yard or something, maybe those things could indicate distance. I don't know if that would mean, like, getting closer together or farther. I don't know. ​ L: Somehow, it all boils down to love, and the vibrational frequency of love. And, and then translating that love and death and love and fear and how to come out, how to come out of these wonderful teachings with the banner, the banner for, the flag of love. I mean I'm thinking of, in the exact same scenario, you know, [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] - this is, off record maybe. N: We'll stop here [shuts recorder off]

  • YARD WORK / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... YARD WORK (YARD STUDIO) HURLEY, NY / MAY 2017 Out of gallery

  • Nina A. Isabelle / The Giant Weed Web at Rosekill Performance Art Farm

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE GIANT WEED WEB IV SOLDIER'S F.A.G. (FEMINIST ART GROUP) at ROSEKILL SEPTEMBER 2016 ​ Feminist Art Group founder IV Castellanos of IV Soldiers Gallery curates a group of artists at Rosekill Performance Farm in Rosendale , NY for a weekend of building and performance. Elizabeth Lamb, Kaia Gilje, Amanda Hunt, Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Quinn Dukes, Anya Liftig, IV Castellanos, Jill McDermid, Claribel Jolie Pichardo.

  • CYBORGS & GENDER | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CYBORGS & GENDER August 25, 2017 A male and female robot bicker about a human woman who is climbing dangerously high up into a tree in the dark while her daughter waits below in a wolf costume. What might happen when human actions align with AI intention? The soundtrack was produced using Apple's text-to-speech system. ​ ​ Photo by Ming Liu

  • THE EUCHARIST MACHINE / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE EUCHARIST MACHINE BANGKOK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL BANGKOK, THAILAND / MARCH , 2017 English with Thai subtitles Thai with English subtitles Inspired by Chris Lehmann’s book The Money Cult: Capitalism, Christianity, and the Unmaking of The American Dream, The Eucharist Machine addresses language, perception, and belief. In The Eucharist Machine, information is skewed by a presentation of jumbled non-linear facts and fiction, science, pseudoscience, and science fiction. Inaccurate grammar and linguistics push the concept even further by incorporating the cockamayme Thai / English subtitles and voice-overs produced by Google Translate and Apple’s Text To Speech system preference in a process that reverse-legitimizes the information. The Eucharist Machine is what happens when the under informed articulate with high-tech features. Information lost in translation becomes a sort of up-cycled spirituality; a futuristic projection of possible renewal of the crumbling dialogue between spirituality, commodity, and financial value. The Eucharist Machine takes a serious, culturally backwards, multigenerational look at what it means to be sanctified. เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นหนังสั้นที่เขียนกำกับและแก้ไขโดยศิลปินนานาชาติ Nina อิสซาเบล แรงบันดาลใจจากหนังสือของคริสมาห์ของเงินลัทธิ: ทุนนิยมคริสต์และ Unmaking ของความฝันอเมริกันภาษาอยู่เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทการรับรู้และความเชื่อ ในศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องข้อมูลจะถูกบิดเบือนโดยการนำเสนอข้อเท็จจริงที่คลั่งไคล้ที่ไม่ใช่เชิงเส้นและนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ pseudoscience และนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ ไวยากรณ์ไม่ถูกต้องและภาษาศาสตร์ผลักดันแนวคิดให้ดียิ่งขึ้นโดยผสมผสาน cockamayme คำบรรยายภาษาไทย / ภาษาอังกฤษและเสียงพากย์ผลิตโดย Google Translate และข้อความของ Apple เพื่อการตั้งค่าระบบเสียงพูดในกระบวนการที่ย้อนกลับ legitimizes ข้อมูล เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นสิ่งที่เกิดขึ้นเมื่ออยู่ภายใต้แจ้งปล้องที่มีคุณสมบัติที่มีเทคโนโลยีสูง ข้อมูล Lost in Translation กลายเป็นจัดเรียงของขึ้นกรณืจิตวิญญาณ; การฉายอนาคตของการต่ออายุเป็นไปได้ของการเจรจาบี้ระหว่างจิตวิญญาณสินค้าโภคภัณฑ์และความคุ้มค่าทางการเงิน ศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องยิงร้ายแรงวัฒนธรรมย้อนหลังดูหลายรุ่นว่ามันหมายถึงความบริสุทธิ์

  • MUSCULAR BONDING DOCUMENTS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MUSCULAR BONDING-PHOTO DOCUMENTS Adriana Disman, Nina Isabelle, Kaia Gilje, Beth Neff, Esther Neff, Edward Sharp M.A.R.S.H, St. Louis / Living Arts, Tulsa, OK ​ February 15 - March 5, 2018 ​ We traveled, lived, worked, and performed together for three weeks as a performance experiment conceived, initiated, and enforced by Esther Neff. On February 15, 2018 we drove from Panoply Performance Lab in Brooklyn, NY to M.A.R.S.H (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in St. Louis, MO. We lived, worked, and ate together under strict and extreme circumstances, and then performed actions that were devised through collective manipulation to "materialize participant's structural realities" at The New Genre Art Festival at Living Arts Tulsa. ​ ​ ​ Kaia Gilje & Adriana Disman carry a sheet of dry wall up a staircase at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing & Activating Radical Social Habitus) in St. Louis, MO. Photo: Nina Isabelle Out of gallery

  • SAN DIEGO ART INSTITUTE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOTHER VS GOD A short creepy video by Nina Isabelle ​ September 28, 2016 ​ The Dead Are Not Quiet was organized by Scott Mitchell Putesky, an artist and musician best known for his work as the guitarist and co-founder of the musical group Marilyn Manson. the exhibition will run concurrently with “The Haunted Art of T. Jefferson Carey. Exhibiting Artists in The Dead Are Not Quiet include Addison Stonestreet, Alex Ingram, Alison Chen & Michael Covello, Anne Pelej, Cayce Wheelock, Clayton Llewellyn, Dakota Noot, Dan Adams, Daniel Corona, David Russell Talbott, Emily Hastings, Eric Potts, Garrett Wear, Hannah Johansen, Hugh Schock, Ivy Guild, Janice Grinsell, Jenya Armen, John Purlia, John Straub, Julia Oldham, Karim Shuquem, Kurosh Yahyai, Larry Caveney, Liza Hennessey Botkin, Lucas Novak, Maidy Morhous, Michelle Mueller + Erik Mueller, Natalie Meredith, Nathaniel Clark, Nina Isabelle, PANCA, Paul Koester, Philip Petrie, Rita Miglioli, Robin Spalding, Shahla Rose, Sheena Rae Dowling, Wick Alexander, and Yvette Jackson.

  • MOTHERING / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOTHERING NINA A. ISABELLE, EVER Z. PEACOCK, & SYLVIA ​ ROSEKILL PERFORMANCE ART FARM ROSENDALE, NY JUNE 3, 2017 MOTHERING looks at a child's nonverbal perception of the unspoken or hidden in relation to the improbability of a hierarchal god or mother. Multilayered family video and sound are projected onto a quasi-defunct Airstream trailer behind the south barn at Rosekill Performance Art Farm while Mother and Son perform with gestural sound-loops and shrouded interpretive movement.

  • MOCK THE CHASM | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOCK THE CHASM NOVEMBER 13, 2016 ​ ART/LIFE INSTITUTE KINGSTON Mock The Chasm was performed at The Art/Life Institute Kingston during Alex Chêllet and Jaime Emerson’s November 2016 Artists In Residency Night of Performance exhibition. Inspired by the 2016 presidential election, the performance aims to inspect the spiritual illusion between God and America and how it is used to warp the space between morality and finance. Actions include worshipping a golden calf, wrestling and subduing a life-sized victim, and a self-crucifixion. ​

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Kingston, NY

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... HYPERACTIVE INSTALLATION JUNE 4 2017 ​

  • Roman Susan // PROPERTY // RPWRHS // Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PROPERTY ROMAN SUSAN & ROGERS PARK / WEST RIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY APRIL 1, 2017 TELLERS I The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of the Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. 20x30 NINA A. ISABELLE February 2017 TELLERS II The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of the Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. 20x30 NINA A. ISABELLE February 2017 ALONG THE WAY Streicher and friends have been displaced. Transported by a drunken maritime time traveling expedition, the three men find themselves near the Chicago surface line sign at 2100 W Touhy Avenue. Peter Van Iderstein's boat, launched at at Greenleaf Avenue and Lake Michigan, has been repurposed as a time traveling vessel. NINA A. ISABELLE 20x30 February 2017 Roman Susan Art Foundation and the Rogers Park/West Ridge Historical Society will present a collaborative exhibit in Spring 2017 reflecting the way neighborhoods emerge and change as a result of land development. For this project, the Historical Society has placed 100 images from the Rogers Park/West Ridge photography archive into the creative commons. The exhibition will include repurposed and reimagined responses to the historical photographic archive. ​ View the full selection of images dating from 1870 to 2005 here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rpwrhs/sets/72157676302462950/ The selection of original images include photographs donated to the Historical Society from the collections of Leonard and Lillian Adler, Katherine Allen (née Dittmar), LeRoy Blommaert, Lillian M. Campbell, Ann Davis Dix, Gail Donovan, Paul and Jean Einsweiler, Fred Elisius, Dorothy Ferguson, Stephen C. Ferguson, Howard Frink, John Peter Geroulis, Ken Gustafson, Elizabeth Habman, Gladys Hoaglund (née Van Iderstein), Maryl Hook, Leslie Keeling (née Pollard), Anthony Kingman, James and Sally Kirkpatrick, Carmen Lara, Rasmus Larson, James C. McCabe, J. Curtis Mitchell, William Morton, Margaret Mary Muno, Marcella Polonsky, Jean R. Price, Sidney and Ann Rockin, Marie Roti (née Bornhofen), Richard Schaul, Grant Schmalgemeier, Marty Schmidt, Toni Sherman (née Albanese), George and Margot Striecher, Mel Thillens, Sr., Ceal Thinnes, Mary Thiry (née Mertens), Albert and Loretta Weimeskirch, Gerald Wester, John Winkin, the American Legion Rogers Park Post #108, Angel Guardian Orphanage, B'nai Zion Synagogue, George Buchanan Armstrong School of International Studies, Cook County Federal Savings & Loan, Devon Bank, Mundelein College (Loyola University Chicago), North Town Public Library, Rogers Park Women's Club, Philip Rogers School, RREEF Management Company, S&C Electric Company, St. Margaret Mary Archives, and Sullivan High School. ​ Tellers I The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of The Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. Tellers II The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of The Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. Along The Way Streicher and friends have been displaced. Transported by a drunken maritime time traveling expedition, the three men find themselves near the Chicago surface line sign at 2100 W Touhy Avenue. Peter Van Iderstein's boat, launched at at Greenleaf Avenue and Lake Michigan, has been repurposed as a time traveling vessel.

  • Nina A. Isabelle - Interviews & Reviews

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... INTERVIEWS LINDA MARY MONTANO INTERVIEW 2020 ACTIVATING PERCEPTION Midtown Arts District 2017 ARTiculACTion 2016 Aaron Pierce February 2017 ​ A: I am a graduate from Utah Valley University and I am writing a dissertation for the university's biannual Art History Symposium. The topic of discussion this year is Maximalism. I am particularly focusing on performance art as the contemporary medium that is reinventing museum spaces and engaging audiences by stimulating the senses more through music, dance, film, and painting combined. That is where your exhibit Animal Maximalism came to my attention. I am completely intrigued and enthralled by your performance art pieces and projects you have created. For this paper, I would love to have your view on performance art and Maximalism. I am interested in hearing some of your methods about performance art and Maximalism. It is rare in art history to be able to have contact with the artist, hence my excitement. If you do not mind sharing your opinion, I would like to know how you feel performance art engages audiences and pushes them to connect on a higher level to art? Also, why are we seeing a shift towards more performance art pieces in museums and galleries? I feel that audiences want to have a full sensory experience. How does Maximalist performance art achieve this better than other medium of art? ​ N: I practice a process of allowance where I let myself do what I want. This approach results in maximum data and action. By letting myself engage with an array of modalities I can generate multiple outcomes and possibilities. Because I'm not limited to any single mode of involvement, I'm free to use painting, performance, photography, or video or a mixture of modalities as I find necessary depending on my agenda and instinct. This suits my athletic, resourceful, and determined nature. ​ I approach performance art in the same way I would approach any other art modality- by paying close attention to gut instincts and psychic impressions in a process designed to override cerebral programming. The aim is always to align action with intention, and make note of the findings and outcome along the way. Performance art is a good choice when the concept I'm grappling with calls for a human body, action, or a narrative to actuate the outcome, especially literal concepts like worshiping the golden calf or using blood to cleanse things. My body can become a tool, a stand-in, or effigy of or for the viewer, creating a point of commonality to facilitate access. Aligning action with intention is also a way to re-frame ritual and an attempt to validate the effectiveness of approaches historically relegated to realms of religious structures and beliefs. I was recently invited to teach an art theory class for kids at The Hudson Valley Sudbury School. Through our discussions it emerged that the students felt most drawn to art practices and outcomes that suited the nature, mentality, and necessity of the individual artist. For instance they could relate to how Chuck Close became successful at painting faces as a result of his lifelong struggle with a facial recognition disorder. In reflecting on my personal method it occurs to me that my mode of operation is dictated by my nature, I didn't choose to function within the Maximalism approach and philosophy, it's just that the philosophy happens to align with my nature. I'm a serial over-doer of all things who relishes the opportunity to push things too far. My work is reactionary because I'm a reactionary person. For instance the first time I encountered minimalism I was ready to explode in a thousand directions. And, as an art student I couldn't help but challenge typical art professor's slogans such as "You have to know when to stop." Of course I could recognized the academically dictated stopping point but I would never in a million years stop there. I've always felt that learning how to challenge, push, or destroy something is a valid study when handled respectfully and with intention. ​ Performance art is an another mode of operating for artists to use in order to find or generate new information, to experiment with creating new experiences, or to try to express something they otherwise couldn't. It can engage the viewer in an intimate way offering the potential to build powerful experiences as it facilitates a space that can involve and include the viewer in a novel physical or psychic way. It's possible that since performance art inhabits walking space where gallery-goers would otherwise be moving about, a psychic connection is created by sharing the same space. As viewers, we know less about what it would be like to hang motionless on a wall. Performance art offers a platform for artists to practice aligning action with intention, a way to possibly re-frame ritual and to build experimental new models for of control or power to replace outmoded religious structures and beliefs. But also, It's possible the performance art trend might be a way for artists to backhandedly confront consumerism and elitism simultaneously, or at least to create the illusion of doing so. Commercial galleries and academic environments can be market driven or exclusive, but performance art has the ability to dissolve those traditional notions and to expand viewership by engaging broader mentalities in a way that would be difficult for strictly visual work focused on heady concepts or dollar amounts. And since we live in a culture of visual bombardment, where viewer's digitally conditioned eyes and minds are increasingly savvy, and in conjunction with consumer programming, we need something that can function both inside of and outside of commercial gallery and academic paradigms. There is a literal dissolution of boundaries. Since performance art is impervious to ownership and commodification, it pushes against market-driven capitalist structures and challenges a system where finances determine success. Issues of marketability, ownership, or commodity all come into play because its difficult to financially capitalize off of performance art. So, maybe it's like most trends- timely and culturally necessity. ​ I developed the Animal Maximalism exhibition concept as a way to bombard the human sensory input manifold with the intention of revealing cloaked information. I use the word "Animal" as an homage to instinct. For me academia operated through reversal, fueling my defiance more than refining me the way school is supposed to, so part of my mission has always been to build legitimate framework for us animals, one that is less cage-like, and Maximalism is a good framework for that agenda. I try to work within and build upon systems that already exist that might reflect and support my authentic nature, and to allow my work to reflect and be a response to the full spectrum of my body's biologic manifestation of its own history within its cultural environment. Maximalism feels like science-fiction, in that it offers the potential for system building where the inward personal landscape can travel all the way outward through the giant jumbled experience of collective household, community, country, and planetary psychic connections. Maybe performance offers an easier access point to the viewer in that we can all relate to each other as humans who are human shaped and have human form. We all share common ways of moving our human forms through space. It's possible that performance could function to create a portal, like a way out or a way in. The Cult of Painting by Nina Isabelle 2014 ​ Painting is a visual, psychological, or metaphysical study or exploration of an object or non-object, a place or non-place, an inner, outer, or simultaneous multiple psychic dimensions, something other, all, or none of the above. Various viscosities of liquid or paste suspending colored pigments in oil, wax, synthetic polymer, or other, are sometimes but not always laid down, poured, sprayed, or applied by the hand as an extension or non-extension of the wrist, elbow, arm, shoulder, hip, body, outer-body, aura, transcended-self, future-self, or by proxy with either a brush, tool, or other, onto a solid or canvas surface in either multiple or single opaque or transparent layers or strokes resulting in a tangible visual object manifest in the physical dimension as having weight, height, depth, mass, and occupying an amount or volume of time and likewise resulting in an equal to, greater than, or less than physical, psychological, or spiritual impact of understood or non-understood ethereal consequences within an inverse unquantifiable psychic dimension. The conception, execution, and result will or won't be quantifiable by subsets of verbal language, written or spoken, which may or may not contain specialized terminology.

  • TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES Out of gallery I was interested in trying to figure out how the body knows what it knows — specifically, the somatic experience of tangible material, the cognitive experience of intangible concepts, and the interplay between these four variables. I was also interested in how repetition seems to create the potential to sidestep consciousness, and I wanted to experiment with that notion to see if I could access different modes of perception or ways of knowing by engaging in a repetitive action for an extended length of time. In setting up the framework for this performance, I mapped out and identified all the parameters that I was able to. I decided on the timeframe and squared off the surface area of my work space. This gave me a way to control the tangible aspects of the performance. By laying out this semi-structured plan, I hoped to create a situation where intangibles and surprises could occur. Starting in the middle of an eighteen foot square of floor space, I set out to make one thousand pinch pots within a span of four hours. I imagined the pots would fill the entire work space and somehow be equally distributed. I counted the pots as I went along and kept track of them in ten groups of ten — something I realized was necessary as I went along and realized would be the only way for me to know when I was done. I was surprised to find that, at the end of the four hours, and down to within a few minutes, I had made the exact amount I set out to make. While I was working, the span of four hours seemed to shrink down to about the feeling of twenty minutes. These are the types of perceptive phenomena I’m interested in working with and demonstrating. How did these things happen so exactly with such little planning? How and why does time seem to stretch or contract depending on levels of engagement, intention, and focus? ​ Things can be objects or subjects. While objects are tangible things abstracted from the particularness of subjects, subjects are the intangible concepts or notions we extract from objects. How do we process the intangible sense data we extract from encountering objects made of particles in the physical dimension and what do we call this process? What are the internal mechanisms we use to govern how we locate and position our physical selves in relation to objects in space? ​ For this project, I constructed and deconstructed a batch of 10,000 intangible and tangible subjects and objects as a way to set both their physical and nonmaterial aspects free. Through forming a set of 1,000 physical objects made of clay with my hands, the conceptual intangibleness of their essence was simultaneously set free and bound as it transformed into material form. Conversely, intangible concepts were released from physicality through the gestural motions accompanied by the transmutation of 9,000 subjects into nonmaterial objects. Equinox: EMERGENCY OF JOY - 10,000 THINGS SET FREE ​ Seventy one artists from around the world work together remotely and simultaneously over the spring Equinox. Organized by Chelsea Burton, Rae Diamond, Erik Ehn, Brenda Hutchinson, Suki O’Kane, “Ten thousand is rooted in the Buddhist concept of the ten thousand dharmas – an image for all observable reality." ​ MARCH 19, 2020 11:49 PM EST - MARCH 20, 2020 1:49 AM EST (Equinox at 11:49 PM EST) ​

  • CZONG INSTITUTE / ARTISTS & LOCATION | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ARTIST & LOCATION CZONG INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART GIMPO, KOREA October 2016 ​ CICA MUSEUM ​

  • NEW SITUATIONS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... NEW SITUATIONS ​ Arranging matter in space is a way to build new situations. June 11, 2018 ​ Out of gallery

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Trauma Trap

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LOCATIONAL TRAUMA TRANSFORM JUNE 23, 2016 The Locational Trauma Transforming Trap was constructed by Neva & Nina Isabelle as an action to align with the intention of absorbing and transforming physical trauma such as broken bones, head injury, and the visual implant of witnessing blood as well as emotional and physical damage to the bodies and psyches of friends and family. A handwoven trauma trap was constructed using black silk. Coated with gymnastics chalk, The Trauma Trap was used to absorb and transform trauma located at 40.8987° N, 77.3561° W. The contaminated trap was then hand washed in a mountain spring in order do dislodge the traumas from multiple physical geographic and bodily locations. One participant reports that the best tricks she learned in Gymnastics was "how to not feel pain."

N I N A  A. I S A B E L L E